Content Marketing

Dating Rules for Getting Great Video Testimonials

Dating Advice for Getting Great Video Testimonials Dating Rules for Getting Great Video Testimonials

badge guest post FLATTER Dating Rules for Getting Great Video TestimonialsEveryone has a different opinion on how to land a date. Some say it takes persistence. To others, it’s all about being in the right place at the right time. In any case, before the dinner and the dancing can happen, someone has to make a move and put it on the line. It can be risky, but getting a hot date is always worth it.

Now, I’m not saying that there’s anything particularly romantic about video marketing, but as I consider the best dating advice I’ve ever received, it strikes me that the whole dating game looks pretty similar to the process of getting video testimonials from clients. We work with a lot of Producers who love to get their happy clients on camera for the world to see, but sometimes, it can take a lot of work to make that happen.

If you’re trying to woo a client into offering up a video testimonial, here are a few tips taken straight from the annals of dating history to help you seal the deal:

1. Find the opportune moment.

Some companies will work a clause into their proposals that gives them the right to mention their clients in promotional materials. That means you can basically choose any time to write up a portfolio piece or grab a testimonial video, but some times are much better than others. The absolute best time? It’s when you’ve just delivered big on a project and left your client speechless. This is the dating equivalent to staring into someone’s eyes and knowing the time is right to make a move. When your client is already impressed and they’re just standing there beaming at you, it’s time sweep them off their feet.

2. Use an irresistible line.

Then again, that moment doesn’t always present itself. Maybe you do a lot of your work online, or you’re already well into a relationship with a client and don’t want to just spring the question on them. That’s when you take a page out of Barney Stinson’s playbook and create your opportunity with an amazing pickup line. Try phrasing your testimonial invitation as a feedback request: “We’re looking for some feedback from our customers. Care to share your thoughts? It would really help us do even better work in the future.” Send over a questionnaire, get them to write their answers first, and then make your big move to turn some of the written praises into video testimonial gold. This works even better when you make it a standard part of every customer engagement, sending an email feedback form at the completion of every project.

3. Go to their place, not yours.

Make it as easy as possible for your testimonial prospects to say, “Yes!” It might seem easier for them if you give them the option to just record some video themselves and send it over whenever they have time, but such a request is sure to make it to the bottom of your clients’ to-do lists. Offer to come out to their location for a quick conversation – not an “interview,” as that word alone can scare some people away – and take away the stress of having to talk directly to a camera or rehearsing lines. To use our dating metaphor, this is your way of saying, “I’ll pick you up around 8.”

4. Be a gentleman.

At the end of the day, you should think of your clients as coworkers. If you ask them out and they say no, you still have to work with them tomorrow. Be patient and respectful throughout the whole process. Some of your clients might not want to give a testimonial for one reason or another, and it’s okay to take “no” for an answer. If you’re respectful of their decision, you might find another opportunity down the line to really wow them and get your testimonial. If, however, you choose to pester your hesitant clients, they’ll start thinking you care more about your testimonial than their business. That can disrupt even the best working relationships.

How do you get the “yes” you’re looking for from your clients? Share your tips in the comments below!

  • http://rhogroupee.com/ Rosemary ONeill

    Love this analogy! It’s also always good to give them the questions or topics in advance; I often email the questions ahead of time. It’s like telling your date “we’re going to have dinner and then go see Skyfall.”

    • http://twitter.com/RockyWalls Rocky Walls

      Glad you liked the post! Questions in advance can work really well, but they’ve also set me up for disaster before. If I send questions in advance I always make sure to also add that they should NOT prepare or script out their answers; instead, just review the questions so you’re not totally caught off guard.

      Thanks for the comment Rosemary!