Content Marketing

The Content Marketer’s Guide to Writing a Book

badge guest post FLATTER The Content Marketers Guide to Writing a BookDoes the very idea of writing a book scare you? It sure freaked me out the first time someone hired me to write one for them. Sure, I had plenty of professional writing and content marketing experience. But writing a book is a horse of a different color.

A book represents an experience like no other your audience has access to today—a chance to sit down with their Kindles, shut off the white noise, and immerse themselves in a world of knowledge. Many of us who consume content on our phones and computers escape the constant barrage of information through books. It’s an experience that focuses your learning, and it’s far from obsolete.

Consider this:

Ninety-six percent of business authors surveyed by Wellesley Hills Group claim they realized significant positive impact on their businesses from writing a book.

This proves that authorship is a huge advantage for brands, and associating executives with a book helps establish their authority in the industry, in turn sharing that leadership with the brand they represent.

Execs are busy, however, so the duty of creating and organizing a book could fall to marketers. This is your chance to take the initiative. (Of course, that’s easier said than done.)

Becoming an author is no joke. It takes talent, time, and know-how.

The truth is that as a content marketer, you already have the talent. All you need is a bit of time and know-how. My new SlideShare presentation The Marketer’s Guide to Writing A Book shows you how you can acquire both quickly. More specifically, it explains why you’ve always had what it takes. For marketers, writing a book is all about dusting off your old content and organizing it in a way that makes the most sense for your audience. Once you have that content structured, you get an opportunity to polish it into a real work of art.

Still not convinced? Pew Research says 8 out of 10 Americans under 30 read a book in the past year. That’s a breathtaking statistic in the face of an increasingly active Internet audience.

Getting started is the hardest part. You need confidence. To get confidence, you need a roadmap and the right tools.

I have faith that marketers and small business owners can share their knowledge with the world through the art of authorship. That’s why I created this presentation—to show you that writing a book isn’t as hard as you think. It’s just another step on the road to a compelling content marketing program.

We need a break from online stimulation. A book (yes, even an e-book) gives us the opportunity to rest our weary attention spans.

It’s worth your while to consider writing a book for dozens of reasons. Find your own. And feel free to grab some free advice on SlideShare via The Marketer’s Guide to Writing A Book.

Related
  • http://www.ckwrites.com ckwrites2

    Nice piece Mark – you’ve got me believing!

    • Mark Sherbin

      Thanks Christopher. You’ve got this!

  • http://www.strategicpropositions.com Jose Palomino

    For the small business owner out there, I highly recommend having the outline to your book and then filling it in by producing blog posts. You’re writing at least a post a week, so it might as well be content to your book. I can’t even tell you how many times I’ve written focused blog posts like this, only to copy and paste large pieces of it into my book manuscripts.

    Another way to generate great information — both that will help steer your book’s content as well as ADD to the content — is to conduct 3 interviews a week with relevant people. For my forthcoming book on sales coaching, I’ve been interviewing 3-5 sales execs every week and it’s pure gold in so many ways.

  • http://sproutsocial.com/features/social-media-engagement Sarah @ Sprout Social

    Great advice, Mark. This is such an easily digestible way to conquer something so intimidating. Although the book will only be as good as the content produced, it’s aspirational to produce top quality stuff that could potentially turn into this long form of content. How are you, by the way? :)

    • Mark Sherbin

      I’m doing well, how are you?? Out on the left coast enjoying access to nature these days. Hope everything is going well at Sprout.

  • supergik

    Nice and awesome. Another Great article. :)