Community Management, Social Media Strategy, Social Media Tools, Brand Communities, Facebook, Social Media Marketing

Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy?

Join me and 21 other speakers for Facebook Success Summit 2010, a Webinar series with everything you need to know about Facebook for business. Sessions start October 5. Go to http://bit.ly/facebooksuccess to save 50% for a limited time.

circles 1 300x164 Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy?Chris Brogan, Darren Rowse, and Kyle Lacy popularized the idea that companies in social media need a home base (Web site or blog), outposts (major customer engagement platforms like LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube) and frontiers (lesser, experimental options like UStream, 12 Seconds).

But now, companies are starting to experiment with using Facebook as their social media home base, instead of as an outpost.

And why not? It doesn’t matter what business you’re in, your customers are on Facebook. Now rocketing past 200 million members (making it the 6th largest country in the world if it were a nation), Facebook offers online reach previously available only in Google and Yahoo flavors.

Come Home to Facebook

Vitamin Water tagged its NCAA basketball television spots with www.facebook.com/vitaminwater producing significant Twitter chatter in the moments following the commercial’s first airing.

Before the commercials, Vitamin Water has approximately 40,000 fans on Facebook, and now has 259,663. Not bad, but the real ROI will come from Vitamin Water activating their fans, not just collecting them.

Retail clothing darling H&M is doing just that with a spiffy new Web site to Facebook integration that displays their Spring collection with engaging Flash animations on the corporate site, but asks visitors to click through to Facebook to comment on each item. Terrific synergy, and solid participation, with more than 100 votes and comments on each garment.

7 Reasons Facebook Could Dominate Your Social Media Strategy

I see 7 advantages to using Facebook as your social media home base.

1. Reach
One of the great axioms of marketing is “Fish Where the Fish Are.” Increasingly, fish of all shapes and sizes are on Facebook.

2. Clarity of Purpose
Facebook enables brands to interact with their fans via wall, discussions, events, photos, videos, etc. without a bunch of other corporate content getting in the way.

3. Analytics
Facebook provides substantial data on the affinity and demographics of your fans. In comparison to Web analytics, Facebook provides a much better sense of who your audience is in real life.

4. Ease of Use
Facebook pages can be established and maintained by everyone in your company that is not Amish. No fancy programming skills required.

5. Promotion
When consumers become fans of your company, that fact is shared with their friends via the real-time update component of Facebook. No public announcement is made when somebody visits your Web site.

6. Personal
The fact that Facebook users have to be real people (unlike MySpace and Twitter, no fakes allowed) and have to be authenticated before use, consumers can’t hide behind anonymous usernames. Plus, because the vast majority of Facebook members use authentic profile pictures, the “relationships” between consumer and brand have an out in the open characteristic that isn’t available on most Web sites.

7. Cost
Free. Totally free. Web developers, insert shudder

4 Reasons Facebook Shouldn’t be Your Social Media Home Base

I see a few drawbacks to pushing Facebook as your social media home base.

1. Brand presentation
Facebook does a terrible job of enabling brands to customize the look and layout of their pages. This is by design, and while it prevents Facebook from devolving into the visual mess that is MySpace, it’s tough to tell your highly paid branding agency that you can’t use the corporate font, colors, etc.

2. Ownership
Facebook is huge and getting bigger all the time. Based on recent reports of 600,000 new members per day, approximately 1,249 people have joined Facebook since you started reading this post. But, no matter how big it gets, you don’t own it. It could be bought, bastardized, ruined.

3. URL
This is perhaps a niggling point, but I’m told that Facebook charges $50,000 for requires a Facebook media buy to get a direct Facebook.com URL like www.vitaminwater.com/facebook. That’s a big ante for many brands. The non-custom Facebook URLs are ridiculous. I had a friend (@lisamloeffler) set up a Facebook page for a local theater company I help direct. The Facebook URL is: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Flagstaff-AZ/Theatrikos-Theatre-Company/61012197614 (thanks, Facebook. That’s super convenient) If I were you, I would set up internal redirects to Facebook. Something like http://facebook.exacttarget.com (insert your brand name in place of my friends/clients at ExactTarget).

4. Analytics
While the demographic data and interactions counting of Facebook’s analytics is great, you don’t get any information on referrers. It sure would be nice to know whether my email campaign, tweets, YouTube video, et al drove people to my Facebook page. Get on it, Facebook.

Facebook as home base. Brilliant, or crazy?

Related
  • Pingback: samillesousa (Samille Sousa)

  • Pingback: slicecast (James Dutton)

  • Stems

    You are wrong in stating that Facebook is charging for vanity urls. They aren’t. If you are a big brand, you can contact them and ask to have a shortened, vanity url for your public profile. (i.e. http://www.facebook.com/cnn)

  • Pingback: JimAngstadt (Jim Angstadt)

  • http://YourWebsite Stems

    You are wrong in stating that Facebook is charging for vanity urls. They aren’t. If you are a big brand, you can contact them and ask to have a shortened, vanity url for your public profile. (i.e. http://www.facebook.com/cnn)

  • Pingback: steveritchie (Steve Ritchie)

  • http://thelostjacket.com/ Stuart Foster

    I think that at this point it has to be completely brand dependent. Facebook is a fantastic base for a skittles, vitamin water, or another established multi-million dollar brand. However, if you are trying to build brand presence, notoriety and develop your product: stick to a website or blog. You have more control over the information you can gather, the format from which you operate and a customized inbound marketing system. Just my two cents.

    Stuart Foster’s last blog post..Tip’d 2.0

  • http://thelostjacket.com Stuart Foster

    I think that at this point it has to be completely brand dependent. Facebook is a fantastic base for a skittles, vitamin water, or another established multi-million dollar brand. However, if you are trying to build brand presence, notoriety and develop your product: stick to a website or blog. You have more control over the information you can gather, the format from which you operate and a customized inbound marketing system. Just my two cents.

    Stuart Foster’s last blog post..Tip’d 2.0

  • http://www.cm-pr.co.uk/ Owen

    I personally wouldn’t advise anyone to use Facebook as a homebase. Yes FB is popular, but it seems less concerned with the wants and needs of its fans(changes to terms & conditions, autonomous changes in layout). I think this could see a slow but steady exodus of people from FB that will leave companies that have put all their eggs in this basket having to rethink their strategy and start from scratch.

  • Pingback: adrevolution (Leanne Beesley)

  • http://www.cm-pr.co.uk Owen

    I personally wouldn’t advise anyone to use Facebook as a homebase. Yes FB is popular, but it seems less concerned with the wants and needs of its fans(changes to terms & conditions, autonomous changes in layout). I think this could see a slow but steady exodus of people from FB that will leave companies that have put all their eggs in this basket having to rethink their strategy and start from scratch.

  • http://www.PaulMiser.com/ Paul Miser

    Jason,

    Great post. I do see the benefit for using Facebook as a Home Base. But I think we are missing the big picture. Yes, the days of having only web “base” presence are over. Companies do need to be on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn etc. but the question becomes “what are we actually doing on these sites?”

    The answer is engaging with individuals. We are giving our customers a platform where they can discuss freely and openly with their most loved and most hated brands. Now here’s a big “What If” about the future. What if we create a networked, dynamic website that spoke to individuals on our site? We saw a glimpse of this yesterday on Chris Brogan’s blog about Dell with their Ideastorm for Healthcare.

    If we understand our niche markets and set up our own networked website to speak to these niches on their level, in their language, we will develop the most powerful home base possible.

    Paul Miser’s last blog post..The Felt Bicycling Brand Badge

  • http://www.PaulMiser.com Paul Miser

    Jason,

    Great post. I do see the benefit for using Facebook as a Home Base. But I think we are missing the big picture. Yes, the days of having only web “base” presence are over. Companies do need to be on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn etc. but the question becomes “what are we actually doing on these sites?”

    The answer is engaging with individuals. We are giving our customers a platform where they can discuss freely and openly with their most loved and most hated brands. Now here’s a big “What If” about the future. What if we create a networked, dynamic website that spoke to individuals on our site? We saw a glimpse of this yesterday on Chris Brogan’s blog about Dell with their Ideastorm for Healthcare.

    If we understand our niche markets and set up our own networked website to speak to these niches on their level, in their language, we will develop the most powerful home base possible.

    Paul Miser’s last blog post..The Felt Bicycling Brand Badge

  • http://twitter.com/cmwooll Cyndee Woolley

    This is good conversation, however, I believe that the 4 reasons against Facebook don’t really outweigh the possibilities of the 7.

    1. Brand Presentation – You are absolutely correct about the brand ‘issues’. However, a company can consiously work around this by strategically placing logos, uploading photos and in the way they communicate with followers.

    The real purpose of social media is the conversation & connecting with the people. Regurgitating the same canned corporate message isn’t going to work.

    2. Ownership is a huge concern, but again, a company can consiously work around it. It would be nice if there was a way to easily back up a friends list in case of usual glitches.

    3. URL issues… For $9.95 you can buy any domain name that you like and redirect it to your friend me page. Facebook has the power to charge for something custom because of their brand… that is capitalism working.

    4. Analytics… For $9.95, you can buy any domain name to track the link click throughs… It is a work around, but not impossible.

    Should a company squat on Facebook for their Social Media strategy?

    Companies should find out where their customers are and interact… if that is facebook, then so be it. Just jump in with an awareness of the limitations.

    Cyndee Woolley’s last blog post..cmwooll: Good letter – RT @andersoncooper: Dear President Obama #78: Ten things – losing the real culture war http://tinyurl.com/d4y3h3

  • http://twitter.com/cmwooll Cyndee Woolley

    This is good conversation, however, I believe that the 4 reasons against Facebook don’t really outweigh the possibilities of the 7.

    1. Brand Presentation – You are absolutely correct about the brand ‘issues’. However, a company can consiously work around this by strategically placing logos, uploading photos and in the way they communicate with followers.

    The real purpose of social media is the conversation & connecting with the people. Regurgitating the same canned corporate message isn’t going to work.

    2. Ownership is a huge concern, but again, a company can consiously work around it. It would be nice if there was a way to easily back up a friends list in case of usual glitches.

    3. URL issues… For $9.95 you can buy any domain name that you like and redirect it to your friend me page. Facebook has the power to charge for something custom because of their brand… that is capitalism working.

    4. Analytics… For $9.95, you can buy any domain name to track the link click throughs… It is a work around, but not impossible.

    Should a company squat on Facebook for their Social Media strategy?

    Companies should find out where their customers are and interact… if that is facebook, then so be it. Just jump in with an awareness of the limitations.

    Cyndee Woolley’s last blog post..cmwooll: Good letter – RT @andersoncooper: Dear President Obama #78: Ten things – losing the real culture war http://tinyurl.com/d4y3h3

  • http://facebook.com/archrival Charles Hull

    Jason – great post. My favorite quote is “Facebook pages can be established and maintained by everyone in your company that is not Amish.”

    Couple points though – #5 is no longer true with the recent changes to Facebook and the news stream. Notifications that a user has fanned a Page no longer appear in their friends newsfeed. It does still appear in the user’s mini feed on their profile page. You are correct though, before they removed this feature it was the primary reason pages like Coke and Red Bull gained so many fans. As you say though it’s most important for brands to focus on activating and engaging these fans, not just collecting them. Unfortunately, this is the area that most of them are struggling with.

  • http://facebook.com/archrival Charles Hull

    Jason – great post. My favorite quote is “Facebook pages can be established and maintained by everyone in your company that is not Amish.”

    Couple points though – #5 is no longer true with the recent changes to Facebook and the news stream. Notifications that a user has fanned a Page no longer appear in their friends newsfeed. It does still appear in the user’s mini feed on their profile page. You are correct though, before they removed this feature it was the primary reason pages like Coke and Red Bull gained so many fans. As you say though it’s most important for brands to focus on activating and engaging these fans, not just collecting them. Unfortunately, this is the area that most of them are struggling with.

  • http://www.eranium.at/blog Stefan Erschwendner

    Hi great post and summary of the pros and cons. I think brand should really try to use the facebook platform to engage and interact with consumers. The main challenge for corporate website in the future will be to become an aggregator for all split up network activities of the brands.

    BTW I think you mixed up the URL at Cons 3. ;-)

    /S

  • http://www.eranium.at/blog Stefan Erschwendner

    Hi great post and summary of the pros and cons. I think brand should really try to use the facebook platform to engage and interact with consumers. The main challenge for corporate website in the future will be to become an aggregator for all split up network activities of the brands.

    BTW I think you mixed up the URL at Cons 3. ;-)

    /S

  • http://facebook.com/archrival Charles Hull

    Jason – one more thing to add, # 3 for reasons not to use Facebook isn’t entirely true – Facebook does not charge $50,000 outright for a vanity URL. However if a brand works with them on a campaign that involves some sort of media spend on Facebook, then Facebook will set them up with a vanity URL. There is no specific charge for the vanity URL.

  • http://facebook.com/archrival Charles Hull

    Jason – one more thing to add, # 3 for reasons not to use Facebook isn’t entirely true – Facebook does not charge $50,000 outright for a vanity URL. However if a brand works with them on a campaign that involves some sort of media spend on Facebook, then Facebook will set them up with a vanity URL. There is no specific charge for the vanity URL.

  • Pingback: tuckross (Tuck Ross)

  • Pingback: InnovationTrend (Social Media)

  • http://katie.heyvan.com/ Katie Van Domelen

    Love the post – I agree that Facebook CAN be your social media home base depending on your product, customers, goals, strategy and, really, how you use it.

    Just wanted to drop a quick note on the vanity URL issue – You can use a simple app to create a shorter URL that looks like one of the following:

    band.to/AnyNameYouChoose/
    politician.to/AnyNameYouChoose/
    artist.to/AnyNameYouChoose/ companies.to/AnyNameYouChoose/ facebook.dj/AnyNameYouChoose/

    you can get the app at http://apps.facebook.com/webaddress/

    I know it’s still not ideal but it’s definitely better!

    Katie Van Domelen’s last blog post..When NOT to Ask Your Customer

  • http://katie.heyvan.com Katie Van Domelen

    Love the post – I agree that Facebook CAN be your social media home base depending on your product, customers, goals, strategy and, really, how you use it.

    Just wanted to drop a quick note on the vanity URL issue – You can use a simple app to create a shorter URL that looks like one of the following:

    band.to/AnyNameYouChoose/
    politician.to/AnyNameYouChoose/
    artist.to/AnyNameYouChoose/ companies.to/AnyNameYouChoose/ facebook.dj/AnyNameYouChoose/

    you can get the app at http://apps.facebook.com/webaddress/

    I know it’s still not ideal but it’s definitely better!

    Katie Van Domelen’s last blog post..When NOT to Ask Your Customer

  • http://www.linkedin.com/in/jenhalloran Jennifer H.

    Great post, Jason. Thanks! I think that, as H&M has shown, it’s possible to use FB in conjunction with a blog or Web site to create a strong crossover presence but it shouldn’t ‘dominate,” per se.

    Another great article that contains additional tips on how to optimize your brand’s FB presence (concurs w/your vanity URL workaround): http://mashable.com/2009/04/01/optimize-facebook-page/.

  • http://www.linkedin.com/in/jenhalloran Jennifer H.

    Great post, Jason. Thanks! I think that, as H&M has shown, it’s possible to use FB in conjunction with a blog or Web site to create a strong crossover presence but it shouldn’t ‘dominate,” per se.

    Another great article that contains additional tips on how to optimize your brand’s FB presence (concurs w/your vanity URL workaround): http://mashable.com/2009/04/01/optimize-facebook-page/.

  • Pingback: michaelgass (Michael Gass)

  • http://www.sharemarketing.wordpress.com/ Matt Hames

    I think something should, but I don’t think it should be Facebook. I’ve referred to it as a social hub, and since most dot coms are simply online brochures, its easier to simply turn to Facebook. However, I’m not sure this is a good long-term strategy.

    But something should be a social hub. And you’re right, programmers and art directors should shudder if more brands pick Facebook.

    Matt Hames’s last blog post..Will social media open us up to new ideas?

  • http://www.sharemarketing.wordpress.com Matt Hames

    I think something should, but I don’t think it should be Facebook. I’ve referred to it as a social hub, and since most dot coms are simply online brochures, its easier to simply turn to Facebook. However, I’m not sure this is a good long-term strategy.

    But something should be a social hub. And you’re right, programmers and art directors should shudder if more brands pick Facebook.

    Matt Hames’s last blog post..Will social media open us up to new ideas?

  • http://ariwriter.com/ Ari Herzog

    Ouch! When you consider many businesses and government agencies ban or outright block access to facebook.com, I’d argue a FB page as the home base is a very bad strategy.

    Moreover, when you further consider I need a FB account to interact with you, it’s a double whammy.

    Ari Herzog’s last blog post..Guest Post by Mark Havenner: How to Cure Twitter Block

  • http://ariwriter.com Ari Herzog

    Ouch! When you consider many businesses and government agencies ban or outright block access to facebook.com, I’d argue a FB page as the home base is a very bad strategy.

    Moreover, when you further consider I need a FB account to interact with you, it’s a double whammy.

    Ari Herzog’s last blog post..Guest Post by Mark Havenner: How to Cure Twitter Block

  • http://www.offmadisonave.com/ William

    Great post Jason!

    In the why not to use FB section a couple of comments:

    If you know FBML (Facebook’s version of HTML) or just regular, there are a few options for developers/designers to customize the look of a business page. It still fits within a tab, but if you’re creative you can do a relatively good job with making the page look more like your web site. Also, you can specify a default tab for new fans to land on, so rather than seeing the wall they can land on this more “designed” page

    And to the URL point – yes, this is a major pain. Site redirects work well (www.mycompany.com/facebook) for now, but FB seems to be rolling out vanity urls to companies too. There are a few already for more popular “brands” http://www.facebook.com/barackobama or http://www.facebook.com/dell

  • http://www.offmadisonave.com William

    Great post Jason!

    In the why not to use FB section a couple of comments:

    If you know FBML (Facebook’s version of HTML) or just regular, there are a few options for developers/designers to customize the look of a business page. It still fits within a tab, but if you’re creative you can do a relatively good job with making the page look more like your web site. Also, you can specify a default tab for new fans to land on, so rather than seeing the wall they can land on this more “designed” page

    And to the URL point – yes, this is a major pain. Site redirects work well (www.mycompany.com/facebook) for now, but FB seems to be rolling out vanity urls to companies too. There are a few already for more popular “brands” http://www.facebook.com/barackobama or http://www.facebook.com/dell

  • Pingback: TrendTracker (Social Media)

  • Pingback: Bluegrass_IT (David Thomas)

  • Pingback: mciullo (Michael Ciullo)

  • http://twitter.com/kathleenal/status/1469797138 Kathleen Al-Marhoon
  • http://www.freshnetworks.com/ Charlie Osmond

    Good post Jason, but I think you’re calling it for Facebook too early.

    One major additional downside of Facebook is the lack of tools for Community Management. Not being able to assign roles and rights to community members, an inability to set taxonomy and keep a community in order is a major issue.

    Perhaps for cool global high-engagement brands like Coke or H&M it’s OK to ignore the role of a Community Manager, but for the majority of firms building engaging communities, it’s not enough to turn up at a popular place like facebook and hope fans will notice you and engage.

    Too many firms jump into Social Media thinking it’s about technology or being where the mass market resides. Our experience at FreshNetworks suggests that for all but the most cool brands, community engagement has to be worked at. And good Community Management is the key. Sadly Facebook does not yet give the kind of community management tools required by most brands.

    Charlie

  • http://www.freshnetworks.com Charlie Osmond

    Good post Jason, but I think you’re calling it for Facebook too early.

    One major additional downside of Facebook is the lack of tools for Community Management. Not being able to assign roles and rights to community members, an inability to set taxonomy and keep a community in order is a major issue.

    Perhaps for cool global high-engagement brands like Coke or H&M it’s OK to ignore the role of a Community Manager, but for the majority of firms building engaging communities, it’s not enough to turn up at a popular place like facebook and hope fans will notice you and engage.

    Too many firms jump into Social Media thinking it’s about technology or being where the mass market resides. Our experience at FreshNetworks suggests that for all but the most cool brands, community engagement has to be worked at. And good Community Management is the key. Sadly Facebook does not yet give the kind of community management tools required by most brands.

    Charlie

  • Pingback: Thoughts about Facebook strategy | Social Web Strategies

  • Pingback: Build_A_Tribe (Build A Tribe)

  • Pingback: DebPlunk (Debra Plunkett)

  • http://rynoweb.com Chuck Reynolds

    As William beat me to it but Facebook does do some vanity urls but only with REALLY big campaigns or companies. As for us normal people we get shafted, and there’s not even any link juice in the urls or pages either… maybe someday they’ll make a big SEO move like twitter did? Maaaybeee

  • http://chuckreynolds.us Chuck Reynolds

    As William beat me to it but Facebook does do some vanity urls but only with REALLY big campaigns or companies. As for us normal people we get shafted, and there’s not even any link juice in the urls or pages either… maybe someday they’ll make a big SEO move like twitter did? Maaaybeee

  • Pingback: preparsed (Ryan Cunningham)

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com/ Jason Baer

    @Will Good point about being able to modify pages using FBML. The tab landing pages is a good idea, too.

    @Chuck Absolutely. You would think FB would be considering some sort of SEO love at some point?

    @charles Thanks for the clarification on fanning showing up in the news feed. I’ll tweak the post.

    @stefan I agree. Whether or not Facebook is the answer, corporate Web sites are going to have to change. It’s going to be about atomized content.

    @Katie Hi there. Great to see you. Thanks as always for the comment. That sounds like a cool app. I’ll check it out.

    @Jennifer Thanks for the link. Good stuff. I also love how Ben & Jerrys is allowing for flavor voting via Facebook Connect. Awesome.

    @Matt Indeed. I don’t think Facebook is the long term answer, for the reasons I’ve illustrated here. But it’s increasingly a big part of the puzzle, if nothing else because you have an audience of 200 million people. Your corporate Web site doesn’t.

    @Ari Thanks as always for stopping by. Really interesting point about Facebook bans in the workplace. I hadn’t thought about that angle, and I’m going to add it to the post. In terms of having to have a FB account to interact, that one doesn’t bother me as much, given that 200+ million people have a FB account. Of course not everyone has a FB account, but a lot do and it’s an easy, inexpensive way to handle brand interaction.

    @Stems Thanks for the clarification on FB vanity URL pricing. I’ve amended the post.

    @Stuart I agree. I like Facebook as an adjunct to your corporate site (like what H&M; is doing) more than I like it as the whole shebang.

    @Owen You could very well be correct. Facebook could face defections and end up being the next Second Life. I’d bet against that happening, but you never know. Yahoo once dominated search….

    @Paul Hooray. You are 1000% correct. Exactly the point of my “activate customers, don’t collect them” post that’s linked from the original post. You gotta have a strategy, regardless of where/what your home base may be.

    @Cyndee Thank you for the excellent comment. I hear you, the hurdles for using FB as a home base are not that challenging operationally. It’s just scary, and in many ways the comments here have painted a better case for the negatives than I did.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com Jason Baer

    @Will Good point about being able to modify pages using FBML. The tab landing pages is a good idea, too.

    @Chuck Absolutely. You would think FB would be considering some sort of SEO love at some point?

    @charles Thanks for the clarification on fanning showing up in the news feed. I’ll tweak the post.

    @stefan I agree. Whether or not Facebook is the answer, corporate Web sites are going to have to change. It’s going to be about atomized content.

    @Katie Hi there. Great to see you. Thanks as always for the comment. That sounds like a cool app. I’ll check it out.

    @Jennifer Thanks for the link. Good stuff. I also love how Ben & Jerrys is allowing for flavor voting via Facebook Connect. Awesome.

    @Matt Indeed. I don’t think Facebook is the long term answer, for the reasons I’ve illustrated here. But it’s increasingly a big part of the puzzle, if nothing else because you have an audience of 200 million people. Your corporate Web site doesn’t.

    @Ari Thanks as always for stopping by. Really interesting point about Facebook bans in the workplace. I hadn’t thought about that angle, and I’m going to add it to the post. In terms of having to have a FB account to interact, that one doesn’t bother me as much, given that 200+ million people have a FB account. Of course not everyone has a FB account, but a lot do and it’s an easy, inexpensive way to handle brand interaction.

    @Stems Thanks for the clarification on FB vanity URL pricing. I’ve amended the post.

    @Stuart I agree. I like Facebook as an adjunct to your corporate site (like what H&M is doing) more than I like it as the whole shebang.

    @Owen You could very well be correct. Facebook could face defections and end up being the next Second Life. I’d bet against that happening, but you never know. Yahoo once dominated search….

    @Paul Hooray. You are 1000% correct. Exactly the point of my “activate customers, don’t collect them” post that’s linked from the original post. You gotta have a strategy, regardless of where/what your home base may be.

    @Cyndee Thank you for the excellent comment. I hear you, the hurdles for using FB as a home base are not that challenging operationally. It’s just scary, and in many ways the comments here have painted a better case for the negatives than I did.

  • Pingback: timbay (Tim Bay)

  • http://ShayDigital.com/ Tim Bay

    While I do think that FB is better as an outpost for many corporate sites, it does provide tools for engagement that marketers may not currently have access to on their own website (e.g. discussion forum, etc.). Also, I think sites like FB provide a good testing ground where marketers can ‘dip their toe in the water’ of more two-way engagement – often without the same restrictions imposed on them by their corporate policies. We have seen situations where successes on FB have made management more open to trying new things.

  • http://ShayDigital.com Tim Bay

    While I do think that FB is better as an outpost for many corporate sites, it does provide tools for engagement that marketers may not currently have access to on their own website (e.g. discussion forum, etc.). Also, I think sites like FB provide a good testing ground where marketers can ‘dip their toe in the water’ of more two-way engagement – often without the same restrictions imposed on them by their corporate policies. We have seen situations where successes on FB have made management more open to trying new things.

  • http://www.modernphoenix.net/ Alison King of Modern Phoenix

    I’m a believer. I wasn’t when I joined FB 3 years ago, but I am now.

    Instead of doing my usual Google Ads this year I recently implemented a (free!) Facebook campaign for a grassroots movement that already had a 6-year-old web presence and highly active message boards. The results from outreach to my non-message board users was astonishing. It brought my lurkers into the light and gave them a forum that was comfortable for them to openly share.

    I also made a Facebook Page that fed into my official pages but featured exclusive pre-release content. It worked out well in generating buzz among the fringe market that normally would have not been reached through my own Constant Contact list or message board member roster.

    My Analytics are proving that a significant amount of traffic came through Facebook activity, and the event I was promoting sold out. That’s all I was after. Mission accomplished on a shoestring and with a little creative content.

    Facebook Username: Modern Phoenix

  • http://www.modernphoenix.net Alison King of Modern Phoenix

    I’m a believer. I wasn’t when I joined FB 3 years ago, but I am now.

    Instead of doing my usual Google Ads this year I recently implemented a (free!) Facebook campaign for a grassroots movement that already had a 6-year-old web presence and highly active message boards. The results from outreach to my non-message board users was astonishing. It brought my lurkers into the light and gave them a forum that was comfortable for them to openly share.

    I also made a Facebook Page that fed into my official pages but featured exclusive pre-release content. It worked out well in generating buzz among the fringe market that normally would have not been reached through my own Constant Contact list or message board member roster.

    My Analytics are proving that a significant amount of traffic came through Facebook activity, and the event I was promoting sold out. That’s all I was after. Mission accomplished on a shoestring and with a little creative content.

    Facebook Username: Modern Phoenix

  • http://www.mariareyesmcdavis.com/topics/facebook/ Maria Reyes-McDavis

    Your list of 4 as to the not side of using Facebook as an outpost, are incredibly compelling. While insight is good, the data Facebook provides isn’t the best. I also think many companies have too much of a problem activating those fans… that should be the biggest driver, does Facebook facilitate what you’re business needs to do to communicate and co-create with your audience. Good stuff, as always :-)

    Maria Reyes-McDavis’s last blog post..Marketing Book Review: Me 2.0 by Dan Schawbel

  • http://www.mariareyesmcdavis.com/topics/facebook/ Maria Reyes-McDavis

    Your list of 4 as to the not side of using Facebook as an outpost, are incredibly compelling. While insight is good, the data Facebook provides isn’t the best. I also think many companies have too much of a problem activating those fans… that should be the biggest driver, does Facebook facilitate what you’re business needs to do to communicate and co-create with your audience. Good stuff, as always :-)

    Maria Reyes-McDavis’s last blog post..Marketing Book Review: Me 2.0 by Dan Schawbel

  • Pingback: jazzyg (jazzyg)

  • Pingback: andrewgerrard (Andrew Gerrard)

  • Pingback: JulieBurgess (JulieBurgess)

  • http://www.paulubiadas.com/ Paul U

    If you have the money to advertise on them then you will get your desired audience but if you are thinking of building your friends that will be along one.

    Paul U’s last blog post..How to create your own RSS subscriber reminder

  • http://www.paulubiadas.com Paul U

    If you have the money to advertise on them then you will get your desired audience but if you are thinking of building your friends that will be along one.

    Paul U’s last blog post..How to create your own RSS subscriber reminder

  • Pingback: avenlea (avenlea)

  • Pingback: RocketPopScott (Scott Dickens)

  • Pingback: scottdickens (Scott Dickens)

  • Pingback: scottdickens (Scott Dickens)

  • Pingback: radhakhalsa (radhakhalsa)

  • Pingback: TheRealPRMan (Steve Farnsworth)

  • Pingback: Facebook: Home of the Arab-American Challenge « Nad’sWorld

  • Pingback: A Homerun for Twitter | Socialmedialand

  • http://twitter.com/alvinyudistira/status/ alvinyudistira

    RT @Don_Crowther: Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy? http://ow.ly/2MPv

  • http://twitter.com/julia_kline/status/1514019366 Julia Kline

    Fascinating article comparing pros and cons of using a Facebook fan page as your ~ gasp ~ main web page. http://ow.ly/2MPv

  • http://twitter.com/thefactory/status/1514585363 Shane Osborne

    RT @Don_Crowther: Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy? http://ow.ly/2MPv

  • Pingback: jlysne (Josh Lysne)

  • Pingback: SportsFan4 (Josh Gans)

  • http://twitter.com/jlysne/status/1522841011 Josh Lysne

    Reading “Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy?” by @jaybaer http://bit.ly/AIaKr

  • http://twitter.com/sportsfan4/status/1522944629 Josh Gans

    RT @jlysneReading “Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy?” by @jaybaer http://bit.ly/AIaKr Facebook is cool but overrated

  • Pingback: links for 2009-04-29 « Live, Laugh, Love

  • http://twitter.com/montelutz/status/1722446271 montelutz

    RT @tweetmeme Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy (7 reasons why it should, 4 reasons why not) http://bit.ly/41edVW

  • Mike

    Facebook should not be a homebase, it’s just one tool among many to use. What you gain in a base of people (how accurate is the 200 million number?) you lose in control. You’re dependent upon Facebook, and that makes no sense. Consider the number of people and strengths of Facebook versus other formats strategically instead.

    Thank you for the great articles and information. You’re very helpful and knowledgeable.

  • http://YourWebsite Mike

    Facebook should not be a homebase, it’s just one tool among many to use. What you gain in a base of people (how accurate is the 200 million number?) you lose in control. You’re dependent upon Facebook, and that makes no sense. Consider the number of people and strengths of Facebook versus other formats strategically instead.

    Thank you for the great articles and information. You’re very helpful and knowledgeable.

  • http://www.addisonscompass.com/ Erin

    Facebook is the greatest of all social mediums for word of mouth use, especially in the age range of 30 to 45 years olds; however, it doesn’t give you reallly much area to showcase your business and a lot of people don’t get around to getting to the group page often or give you support to go direct to other tools like twitter.

    I still believe that a person’s “home base” should be their website, with links to all other social networking.

  • http://www.addisonscompass.com Erin

    Facebook is the greatest of all social mediums for word of mouth use, especially in the age range of 30 to 45 years olds; however, it doesn’t give you reallly much area to showcase your business and a lot of people don’t get around to getting to the group page often or give you support to go direct to other tools like twitter.

    I still believe that a person’s “home base” should be their website, with links to all other social networking.

  • Pingback: If Ford Can Embrace Chaos, What’s Your Excuse? | Builder Social Blog

  • http://www.antioxidantalley.com/ Jon Christensen

    My stats show that when I tweet & update FB status with a link, the FB users spend more time on the site. Numbers that click on the link on a % basis are about the same from both.
    [rq=13385,0,blog][/rq]Why Do We Sell The Products We Do?

  • http://www.antioxidantalley.com Jon Christensen

    My stats show that when I tweet & update FB status with a link, the FB users spend more time on the site. Numbers that click on the link on a % basis are about the same from both.
    [rq=13385,0,blog][/rq]Why Do We Sell The Products We Do?

  • Pingback: xNikos (Nikos Xydas)

  • http://twitter.com/xnikos/status/2250850148 Nikos Xydas

    Liked: Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy | Social Media …: 7 Reasons Facebook Could Do.. http://bit.ly/16JSdO

  • Nikos Xydas

    Liked: Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy | Social Media …: 7 Reasons Facebook Could Do.. http://bit.ly/16JSdO

  • Pingback: Creative Generator » Blog Archive » Social Media Guide

  • http://twitter.com/tbctainment/status/6248277942 tikabanget

    Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy? — http://bit.ly/7CcSOn

  • http://twitter.com/sunnyc/status/8241713490 Sunny

    Old post but still makes u think when conceptualizing ur SM strategy. Should Facebook Dominate Ur Social Media Strat? http://ow.ly/10Cp8

  • http://twitter.com/ghazamfar/status/19578781197 Marthe Neda Gonthier

    RT @lissnup: RT @witnessorg: If int'l outcry can keep a woman being stoned, can same get a woman released from prison? http://ht.ly/2gCh

  • http://twitter.com/francissmythe/status/20253417895 Francis Smythe

    RT @jaybaer: Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy? http://bit.ly/9hgTDY

  • http://twitter.com/myreactiveone/status/21360834686 Toño Hernández

    @jaybaer: Should @Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy? http://om.ly/rKQd <– good question!

  • http://twitter.com/mikefreyparadux/status/21360941294 Mike Frey

    Dominate is a strong word, but very valid points. RT @jaybaer: Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy? http://om.ly/rKQd

  • http://twitter.com/laurencubed/status/21360992602 Lauren Armstrong

    RT @jaybaer: Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy? http://om.ly/rKQd

  • http://twitter.com/impactmax/status/21361108031 impactmax

    Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy | Convince & Convert http://ow.ly/2qulG

  • http://twitter.com/leannelabelle/status/21361233471 Leanne Labelle

    Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy | Social Media Marketing | Social Media Consulting – Convince & http://bit.ly/16JSdO

  • http://twitter.com/marionconway/status/21362245263 Marion Conway

    RT @impactmax Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy | Convince & Convert http://ow.ly/2qulG

  • http://twitter.com/marionconway/status/21362245263 Marion Conway

    RT @impactmax Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy | Convince & Convert http://ow.ly/2qulG

  • http://twitter.com/shannonholato/status/21362667966 Shannon Holato

    Interesting read – RT @jaybaer: Should Facebook Dominate Your #SocialMedia Strategy? http://om.ly/rKQd

  • http://twitter.com/kimkpsg/status/21363066146 Kim Kemmer

    RT @jaybaer: Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy? http://om.ly/rKQd

  • http://twitter.com/chieflemonhead/status/21363409262 Judi Samuels

    RT @jaybaer: Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy? http://om.ly/rKQd

  • http://twitter.com/sa11ybucca/status/21385071594 Sally Harvey

    RT @jaybaer: Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy? http://om.ly/rKQd

  • http://twitter.com/tinamonod/status/21395788318 tinamonod

    RT @jaybaer: Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy? http://om.ly/rKQd

  • http://twitter.com/benasmith/status/21401467665 Ben Smith

    Intersting post from @jaybaer – Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy? http://bit.ly/b0Xt4t

  • http://twitter.com/billnigh/status/21410261326 Bill Nigh

    RT @benasmith: Intersting post from @jaybaer – Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy? http://bit.ly/b0Xt4t

  • http://twitter.com/websnapshot/status/21442084816 Fauzia Burke

    RT @jaybaer – Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy? http://om.ly/rKQd (Good read. Pros and Cons)

  • http://twitter.com/hallaronpr/status/21501483712 Mike Hallaron

    RT @jaybaer: Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy? http://om.ly/rKQd

  • http://twitter.com/socialmediacre/status/21696409905 SocialMediaCRE

    RT @jaybaer: Should Facebook Dominate Your Social Media Strategy? http://bit.ly/9hgTDY

  • http://www.blackfridayplanet.com/ William Hushburn

    Facebook has been the place wherein majority of the vast viewers you needed are present. Better have your posts come along with a link and you’ll just be surprised with the traffic that you’re getting

  • Pingback: Where the F@&! Should My TV Spot Send People? « Ideas for a Smarter, Faster World

  • letstalkandchat

    I just found a great company that builds websites for info products. To keep your costs low, they’ll mentor you on how to create your site, design a marketing funnel (one of the guys works in Hollywood and makes really slick videos), and the other guy programmed Myspace. If you’re looking to have professional web design for your small business and not waste any time or money then check their site out. Check them out: http://www.mikelmurphy.com/easy-info-product-site-system/

  • juandecop