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How GoFundMe Changed Fundraising with Social Media

Posted Under: Social Pros Podcast
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Anna Hrach

Convince & Convert

Daniel Lemin

Convince & Convert

Erika Lovegreen

ICUC Social
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@BrieGF

Brittany Cabriales, Head of Social Media at GoFundMe, joins this Social Pros podcast episode to discuss how social media can be a force for good.

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Social Media’s Role in Promoting Good CausesHow GoFundMe Changed Fundraising with Social Media

Brittany Cabriales, Head of Social Media at GoFundMe, is on this episode of Social Pros to share the strategies and successes behind GoFundMe’s social media push.
GoFundMe is an instantly recognizable name in the online fundraising world. Part of this is down to users sharing their fundraisers on social media, which almost every user does. Brittany explains how the social team helps to get the word out about important causes and the effect this has on fundraising.
Brittany shares why timing is crucial and how timely fundraisers can raise thousands of dollars more. This is why promoting on social media is key, so you have to move fast.
Brittany also shares how GoFundMe’s social media success is largely down to organic content rather than paid advertising. We also hear how different social platforms do better with certain types of fundraisers and how to tell an effective story with your fundraiser for maximum success.

In This Episode:

  • 3:18 – Why GoFundMe is hoping to broaden its audience reach
  • 4:41 – The impact of the pandemic on GoFundMe
  • 6:28 – How the pandemic spurred people into action through fundraising
  • 7:21 – How GoFundMe uses social media to spread the word about good causes
  • 9:36 – Brittany explains how GoFundMe targets both fundraisers and participants
  • 10:17 – How different social platforms are better for different audiences
  • 11:25 – How GoFundMe decides what fundraisers to promote
  • 13:52 – Why Brittany is always trying to stay on top of social media trends
  • 14:21 – How GoFundMe’s choice to highlight fundraisers affects the donations
  • 16:34 – Brittany explains GoFundMe’s new social strategy
  • 17:38 – Why GoFundMe sees more success with organic search over paid
  • 18:29 – The top metrics that GoFundMe watches
  • 20:19 – How Brittany approaches campaigns on different social media platforms
  • 22:33 – GoFundMe’s new ventures on TikTok
  • 24:34 – Brittany’s tips for gaining traction with your GoFundMe campaign
  • 27:41 – Why Gen Z is one of the most engaged donor demographics on GoFundMe
  • 28:43 – GoFundMe’s approach to social care and social listening
  • 29:15 – How Brittany’s experience in customer support helps her in her role now
  • 31:06 – Why “every cause is important” in Brittany’s eyes
  • 32:33 – Brittany’s top tip for those looking to become a social pro

Quotes From This Episode:

We see a lot of the trending day-to-day fundraisers do better on Twitter. The heart-warming fundraisers for families, babies, or veterans do better on Facebook. Click To Tweet
“It’s always just about raising awareness and just trying to be a topic of conversation and on as many social platforms as possible.”@brit_cab
“Being transparent really goes a long way. If someone knows that their $10 is going to XY and Z, it really helps them get over that hump of trust.”@brit_cab

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Episode Transcript

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Brittany

Cabriales:

People

people know the importance of fundraisers and they know that, you know, a single donation can change someone’s life sometimes. And it really is just that, that beauty of the collective power of humanity coming together, like I can donate $5. You can donate 10, they can donate 20. And then just seeing it all come together and grow is really like the beauty of it. We’ve never, we have done, we’d like tested in, in paid ads, but we’ve always just found that organic has worked the best for us.

Jay

Baer:

No,

Adam Brown, if we pulled the social pros community and said, how much would you love to never have to buy any ads in social media? I think we would get a pretty broad agreement that that would be awesome.

Adam

Brown:

It

is 2020, I’m sorry, 2010 all over again. I thought this was surprising, but when you have something that breaks the algorithm, something that cuts through on engagement and something that gets people by definition surrounding and engaging in liking on something that has positive sentiment. It’s perfect. Brittany has an extremely challenging job and she talks about all the wonderful and amazing things that she’s doing, but that aspect is fascinating. And I think we would all aspire to, to have that opportunity. Yeah.

Jay

Baer:

It

was a fantastic conversation with Brittany Cabriales who leads a social media at GoFundMe. You’re gonna enjoy this one friends, I’m Jay Baer from convince and convert. He’s Adam Brown from Salesforce learned a lot in this episode and, and this will make you feel good as well. You also feel good if you read Salesforce is new state of marketing report. They surveyed some 8,200 global marketing executives on all the things that matter to each and every one of us in marketing today. Some really interesting findings in that report as well, especially one that kind of made me sit up and take notice is the convergence of marketing and customer experience. We’ve been talking about that for a long time, but this report would indicate that it has actually happened now. So I want you to download it. It won’t cost you anything. Just go to Bitly slash a state of marketing report. That’s bit dot L Y slash state of marketing report. That’s all lower case. My friends, upper case. It should be the name of Brittany Cabri Ellis head of social media for GoFundMe. This week’s guest on the social pros podcast. Here she comes.

Speaker

4:

[Inaudible]
Jay

Baer:

Friends

with the program. If you ever wanted to create a fundraiser to support the social pros podcast, we have the perfect person to help facilitate your large. Yes, it is Brittany Cabri. Ellis is the head of social media for go fund me, Brittany, welcome to the show.

Brittany

Cabriales:

Thanks

for having me.

Jay

Baer:

We're

delighted to have you here for folks in the social pros community who aren’t familiar with, how GoFund me works. Could describe it for them please.

Brittany

Cabriales:

Yeah,

of course. So a go fund me as a social fundraising platform, which allows anyone to create an account and then fundraise for themselves for a friend and raise money to reach their goals and fund both their needs and their dreams.

Jay

Baer:

Are

there a particular target audience for GoFund me like, is there a, a, a life stage or a circumstance or a scenario where a go-fund me is used more often than in other scenarios that you find?

Brittany

Cabriales:

Yeah,

I’d say that the vast majority of people would most closely associate us with, you know, medical Memorial, any sort of emergency fundraising. That’s where, where we kind of got off the floor from. But we really are hoping to expand the use cases that people associate with go find me. So, you know, we want people to obviously be able to fundraise for, you know, their cancer or for you know, in a car accident that someone was in. But, you know, we also want people to be able to fundraise for their tuition or to help pay for, you know, a kid’s music lessons and anything and everything in between.

Jay

Baer:

How

long has GoFund me been in business now?

Brittany

Cabriales:

So

we just hit 10 years in 2000

Jay

Baer:

Oh

10 years. Geez. I can’t be with him that long. And what explosive growth, I think you said off air the have 400 or so employees now, and I know there’s just thousands and thousands and thousands and thousands of fundraisers every day it is, it is really part of the cultural conversation now in a very meaningful way, which is extraordinary. I wanted to ask you this question what impact did the pandemic have on, on GoFund me? Was it sort of an increase, a disproportionate increase in GoFund me because of all the uncertainty in the pandemic or, or and the fact that obviously it’s virtual or no real difference in trajectory? What did you, what did you see during, during COVID?

Brittany

Cabriales:

Yeah,

so the pandemic was definitely an increase in our, in our own business. And, you know, I think that you could make that assumption just based on everything that was going on in the world, obviously fundraising for, you know, people who were experiencing COVID themselves or a loved one. And then all the after effects of the pandemic of that, that, that had on, you know, the economy and the job job market. You know, we saw a flood of people come to our site to help fundraise for social justice issues and to, you know, come together and create like mutual aid funds. And we really saw that our platform was able to be a home for all these people that were trying to fundraise to not only help, but to support these larger causes.

Adam

Brown:

You

know, one of the things Brittany, I can only suppose is that during the pandemic, and if we separate the time, because there were so many other issues of social unrest and black life’s letter and things that it certainly drove a lot of interest in GoFund me sponsorships. But if we separate that, I got the feeling that fundraising and philanthropy just changed in general because so many of us couldn’t go out and in kind, you know, volunteer our time or their work. And people felt that this was the way that they could participate. Did, did you see the same thing from your vantage point?

Brittany

Cabriales:

Definitely.

I think a lot of people were trying to find ways that they could, you know, not only just like support these social justice movements, but to like take action and actually do something that they could quantify. And fundraising was an easy way to do that. You know, you could do it all online, you could send your friends a link and you could fundraise, you know, a couple thousand dollars for a group that you really cared about or an organization that you really thought was changing the world.

Adam

Brown:

You

mentioned GoFundMe has been around for 10 years. And I think I, without hitting the mute button on my mind, I went, wow, because I had, I had no idea of that in those 10 years go fund me has become a verb. It is the service that is ubiquitous and it’s inherently social. I fact, I would say it doesn’t, it couldn’t even exist without social because of that. How much of the overall marketing and promotion of GoFund me is happening in your wheelhouse of, of social media? What does that look like? And what does it look like as marketing and promoting GoFund me as GoFund me and marketing and promoting GoFund me through one of those, as Jay said, hundreds or thousands of fundraisers that take place every day on your platform.

Brittany

Cabriales:

Yeah.

that’s a great point. Like I said, in the intro, like we are a social fundraising platform I would guess close to a hundred percent of people who start GoFund me’s do go on to share it via their social media channels. And that is one of the, you know, the main points that we tell people, like you got to start the fundraiser and you have to share it. And that sharing starts on Facebook, on Twitter, on Instagram, reaching, reaching your friends and your community members who, you know, would see this and want to support you. In terms of our own social promotion, we definitely try to highlight stories that we think would resonate with our own audiences. And that typically is it tends to be fundraisers that are just really relevant to a topical moment. So for instance, you know, I’ll just go back to the pandemic last year. A lot of our fundraisers that we shared on our own channels had to do with, you know, George Floyd and people who were associated associated with, you know, taking this black lives matter movement and turning it into this like worldwide revolution. And that just really resonated with our audience because it was super topical, super relevant, and everyone, everyone wanted to be a part of it. And everyone wanted

Jay

Baer:

The

two that, and Brittany from a social strategy perspective. How do you think about that? Is it, if we, if we promoted merchandise fundraisers that we think people will be disproportionately interested in because it’s the right topic at the right time and the right scenario that they will then say, you know what, at some point I might need to raise funds, therefore I will do it on a go fund me, or is it more so from a contributor standpoint that you’re trying to create a larger pool of overall participants in a fundraiser, right? So I guess the better way to describe this question would be, are you trying to get more fundraising managers or fundraising participants?

Brittany

Cabriales:

I

think it’s a little of both, you know, we want people to see a fundraiser and feel that urge to be like, you know, I can be someone who can contribute to that and help, but we also want to just raise awareness and show that, you know, you might not need to go fund me today, but you know, maybe eventually down the road, because you saw something that we shared or that a friend shared in their feed that now go fund me is top of mind. And you’re like, Hey, I know this is a place I can go and I need help too. I know this is a place I can go when someone in my life needs

Adam

Brown:

The

follow-up Brittany on Jay’s question, do you find that different social platforms are better at one or two of those things? So is one social platform better for reaching the donors and one social platform better at reaching those who, who may want to to create a GoFundMe?

Brittany

Cabriales:

Yeah,

that’s, that’s a really great question. And I think that as most, I think social people would say every platform is different and everyone has its benefits. We see a lot of like the trending day to day fundraisers do better, like on a Twitter versus a lot more of the, you know, heartwarming just fundraisers that have to do with like maybe families or babies or veterans like that, that tends to be our bread and butter and more so on Facebook. And I think that because of the community that’s on each platform, it just, it’s more of what their want and what they’re looking for. But at the end of the day, it’s always just about raising awareness and just trying to be a topic of conversation and is on as many social platforms as possible.

Jay

Baer:

Brittany,

I’d love to ask you about the operations side of that a little bit more. So there are so many simultaneous fundraisers going on the platform at all times. How, how do you decide what to feature in your own social? Is it, is it social listening? And you’re like, okay, there’s some conversation about this one already. So now let’s kind of promote it, quote unquote to our own social channels. And, and that will kind of an amplifier effect. Or do you have some other kind of internal tool that, that shows you everything that’s on the platform and kind of flags those that might be interesting to put it in social? Or is it just sort of your own instinct in and looking around on the platform and seeing what’s cool.

Brittany

Cabriales:

Yeah,

I’d say once again, it’s a little bit of everything. We definitely have internal tools that tell us, Hey, this trend, this fundraiser is trending. It’s getting a lot of eyes. And so we’ll always look into that and be like, all right, how can we get this out? Even further, social listening, definitely people are talking about it. We want to share it even further. It could also be Hey, we’re seeing a lot of people are talking about this topic. Let’s see if there’s a fundraiser that we can relate back to this and drive some

Jay

Baer:

Traffic

upside down.

Brittany

Cabriales:

Yeah,

exactly, exactly. And the immediate thought that I had is during the the Olympics, I don’t know if you guys saw, everyone was talking about the Nigerian men’s basketball team and their Cinderella run. And we happened to find that someone had created someone within that organization had created a go-fund me to help fund the the team. And so we were able to get that out there and really get it some, some boost,

Adam

Brown:

I

would assume then Brittany, that a lot of what you do has to be kind of keeping your finger on the XY Geist and that, you know, oh, here comes a situation. Let’s go see if there is a GoFund me that is starting up. Is it getting any traction? And then how can we use and leverage that not only to drive people to that needed

Jay

Baer:

For

a squid game fundraiser, if there is one

Adam

Brown:

I

got through episode one this weekend, I don’t, I don’t know if I’m going to cut. I don’t know. I’m trying, I’m trying, Jay. But is, is that part of your, of your job, not just listening to social for social sake, but really trying to figure out kind of what what’s happening in the world right now that may drive people to, to want to donate or, or seek donate

Brittany

Cabriales:

A

hundred percent. I’m always trying to stay on top of trends and figure out what people are talking about and what could be really relevant in that moment. That’ll get some, get some people, some help is at the end of the day, you know sharing a fundraiser is us trying to make sure that as many people who might be interested in supporting it will see it and support it.

Jay

Baer:

Are

there any habits, social pros, listeners, if you want to know what’s up in the world, just reach out to Brittany cabaret, Ellis, head of social at a go fund me, she’ll be like, yeah, here’s, what’s up. Here’s what’s going on. Is there a huge impact on a fundraiser? If you put it on your main channels, like, do you see like huge spikes in participation in, in funds raised, et cetera?

Brittany

Cabriales:

It

definitely depends. You know, sometimes we share something that we thought was really gonna resonate and sometimes it falls a little flat, but a lot of times, you know, getting something out at the right moment or being the first to talk about something like it definitely has an effect and it can raise tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of dollars more just because, you know, people want to share it. People, people think it’s worth supporting.

Jay

Baer:

That's

gotta be really cool for you personally, right. To be in social and say, Hey, here’s a cause that I think is really interesting or really relevant to what’s happening in society. We’re going to put it in our own social promotion. And it’s going to turn into tens or hundreds of thousands of extra dollars for that. Cause that that’s gotta be rewarding as opposed to some of our guests, God love them. We love all of our guests here. I sold Kerberos, but you know, selling more toaster strudel or whatever, isn’t quite as maybe personally rewarding as, as what you’re doing, that’s going to be pretty awesome.

Brittany

Cabriales:

Definitely.

I feel very lucky we have just yeah, to be able to see the impact that you can have on a daily basis. It really is just so fulfilling.

Jay

Baer:

Do

you tell people when you’re going to put their fundraiser in social, do you say, Hey, by the way, this is going on our own Facebook here momentarily. So buckle up kids.

Brittany

Cabriales:

We

do once in awhile, especially if for instance, like if I know our comms team is pushing a fundraiser and they’re already in touch with the organizer on, sometimes it makes sense to be like, Hey, like check out our Twitter page too. Like, we’re going to share your story there almost every single time. Everyone is just ecstatic and I’m super happy that, you know, we see their story and that we love it. And they’re happy just to get out there.

Jay

Baer:

Do

you have a set cadence that you’re trying to fulfill with your social posts or fundraisers that you’re emphasizing or you’re trying to say, all right, it’s, it’s one per day on Facebook that we’re going to feature and, and one per day on Twitter or is it just, Hey, when it feels like it’s meritorious, I’m going to promote it to the timeline, otherwise we’re not going to force it.

Brittany

Cabriales:

Yeah.

So our strategy has definitely changed in that regard. I think in the past years, cause I’ve, I’ve been here for seven years and in the past it was always like, get out as many as possible. Like just get the word out. When our new CEO came on board, [inaudible] he kind of got to flip the switch on me a little he’s like Brit, like it’s gotta be, it’s gotta be meaningful. Every, every tweet matters. You don’t need to post every day and I’ve, it’s been a real learning experience to just hear his, his take on things and how we should be approaching socials. And so it definitely has become more of a, is it relevant? Is it topical? Is it going to hit versus like, just get it out, get it out, get it out.

Adam

Brown:

So

seeing that your content by definition is the algorithm killer. I mean, it is the, why would they care? Why would they share it’s it’s just there. And also recognizing that by definition, you have this, pin-up a trove of ambassadors who are the donors or the donate orders. You know, that are saying this up. Do you have to do any paid social media efforts to drive more traffic and awareness? Or is everything, are you the anomaly? Are you doing everything organic?

Brittany

Cabriales:

We

are doing organic. Yes. I know a lot of people are shocked to hear that. But we, I think we are, we’re in a really cool area where people people know the importance of fundraisers and they know that, you know, a single donation can change someone’s life sometimes. And it really is just that, that beauty of the collective power of humanity coming together, like I can donate $5, you can donate 10, they can donate 20. And then just seeing it all come together and grow is really like the beauty of it. We’ve never, we have done, we’ve like tested in paid ads, but we’ve always just found that organic has worked the best for us.

Adam

Brown:

I'm

curious, kind of getting back to analytics, we’ve talked about those, those, those macro analytics and how you kept your finger on the pulse of the site guys, to kind of see what is the next big thing that people are, are interested in passionate about as you start looking at social analytics. I know you’ve mentioned before the show engagement, follower growth and cinnamon are your key metrics. I’m really curious about cinema engagement, follower growth. I think all of our listeners understand how are you looking at cinnamon and specifically, what are you tracking? Are you tracking the sentiment related to go-fund me or the sentiment related to again, programs that are taking place fundraising efforts on the platform are a little bit of both.

Brittany

Cabriales:

I

would say a little bit of both, but definitely like we use I’m sure some, some folks have seen that a lot of social management platforms have, you know, those word clouds where you’re most closely associated with specific words, and we’re always trying to, you know, make sure that we’re associated with good kind, helpful giving back. Like, and we’re always trying to aim to be more of those instead of more like the negative ones. So actually right now we’re in the middle of transitioning over to a new social management platform. So we’re having a small little skip in our step, but once we’re onboard with them, we’ll hopefully get right back into that.

Jay

Baer:

One

of the things I think is interesting, Brittany looking at your social channels is you’ve got a different creative approach in some circumstances like your Instagram is very illustration heavy, right? It’s got a very consistent visual theme, which I think is really cool because it would be fairly easy to just sort of, you know, okay, here’s the fundraiser does your, and you know, Lincoln bio. But, but there really is sort of a heavy kind of brand styles to it. I’d love for you to talk about sort of that evolution and, and how you think about different channels as, as sort of different components of the overall GoFund me brand.

Brittany

Cabriales:

Yeah.

So I’m really happy you brought that up because we started this new campaign on Instagram called creators for kindness, and we really saw this as an opportunity to just do something different and unexpected from the brand go fund me. I think everyone would think, you know, usually just the telling the fundraiser stories is, you know, what do, but we really wanted to expand into a new audience and, you know, become a part of this creator economy. So we started this new program called creators for kindness, and we’re working with hundreds of illustrators who all applied through our application process and how it works is we give you a thousand dollars and we just ask you to create two pieces of content. Typically they choose to do something around kindness or self care doing good in the world, you know, spreading, you know, just general good vibes.

Brittany

Cabriales:

And

then usually one related to maybe like a cause or an organization that they’re passionate about. And what we’re really seeing is just giving them that broad creative brief is really allowing every creator to just express themselves and, and highlight the things that they care about because anything, you know, if one person cares about it, I can guess a million more well. And so this new strategy is really leaning into this idea of one that, you know, we need more kindness in the world and go fund me hopes that we can be a place that, that is born and is shared. And to that, you know, there’s so many creators out there who want to raise awareness for something that they’re passionate about and we’re giving them that platform to do so. And in the process, we’re getting some really, really cool art. So if you don’t follow us on Instagram, you definitely should.

Jay

Baer:

Yeah,

I agree. It is really cool. Instagram.Com/Go fund me social pros community. It’s a nice example of, of sort of that taking a social strategy that really is disparate and applying it to a single channel. We always talk on this show about not doing the same thing in every channel. And this is a terrific example that you can go show your own team about how to do it, do it right. I know you’re relatively new to Tech-Talk, but tell us what’s what’s your plan there?

Brittany

Cabriales:

Yeah.

So we just got a tech talk, I would say sometime in the last month, maybe tail and it’s, it’s the wild, wild west out there. Let me tell ya. So we’re, at this point in time, we’re kind of I guess you could say throwing spaghetti at the wall, seeing what sticks we’re trying to share, share more of those kinds of stories, but we’re also trying to, you know, do some on-trend stuff and give, you know, obviously the Tech-Talk community. I think that some brands get it wrong when they go in there and they just kind of try to advertise traditionally. And so our goal is really just to, you know, have fun and be really creative in the ways that we’re talking about our brand, talking about fundraisers, helping our community reach their fundraising goals.

Adam

Brown:

This

may be a question that’s kind of beyond kind of social marketing and communications, but seeing that go-fund me is so inherently social and the, the, the, the, the coexistence and necessary coexistence between GoFundMe and the social platforms. I’m curious if there are kind of relationships formal or informal between you and Facebook and Twitter and tick talk in terms of how you’re working together. And are there any things that our listeners can kind of learn from in your, in your works with, with those organizations?

Brittany

Cabriales:

Yeah,

so I definitely like we have account reps that we work with, but as far as formal partnerships go, we don’t really have any of that. I could even say that Facebook is technically kind of a competitor, because if you don’t know, Facebook does have a fundraising feature that they try to push and get out there. But yeah, we are, we know that Facebook and Instagram and Twitter are the channels that a lot of our campaign organizers rely on to share their stories. So we definitely know how valuable they are to our organization.

Adam

Brown:

Do

you have any tips? This is not going to be the tips question that Jay is going to ask, but those who don’t want to serve, be social pros, but are considering doing a fundraiser on your platform. Have you seen anything again that breaks through the algorithm better in terms of telling their story, making the ask, sharing visual sharing video? What, what is the makeup of a good GoFund me tweaked

Brittany

Cabriales:

You?

You nailed a couple of them right there. Definitely. We always suggest using a great photo of you, of your beneficiary, like having that great content on there. It just helps tell your story even more, obviously writing the stories important. You want to give details. You want to talk about how important it will be to this person to reach the goal. You want to talk about how the money’s being spent. Because another thing we see is being transparent just really goes a long way. And if someone knows that their $10 is going to X, Y, and Z, it really helps them get over that hump of, of trust, because that, that is a lot of what we’re focused on is we want every donor to trust that this campaign organizer is gonna, you know, take that money and use it the right way. We obviously do our due diligence due diligence on our end to make sure that happens. And then I would say, lastly is just posting updates. We have an updates feature as a campaign organizer. So, you know, your, your campaign has been live for a week, post an update, be like, here’s where we’re at. Here’s where we are. I’ve delivered, you know, the first X amount of funds to this person and here’s how it’s being spent. So I would say those are some of the key takeaways we’ve seen

Jay

Baer:

One

quick follow-up on that. Is there a best practice for the length of time that the fundraisers should, should be available? I, as a marketer, I could, I could argue it in a couple of different ways, right? Like give them more time to, and you’ve got more time to message, et cetera, but also like, Hey, there’s a deadline here. So we got to get rolling. So if you seen any best practices there on the platform.

Brittany

Cabriales:

Yeah.

That’s a great question. So go fund me, unlike some other fundraising platforms, like you might think of Kickstarter we don’t have like a set amount of time that you can, you can fundraise for like, oh, it all has to be raised within 30 days. We actually, we don’t have any fundraising deadlines like that. So I would say that the vast majority of donations will, you know, appear in those first weeks, week or two. But we’ve definitely seen campaigns that go under fundraise for a years and just continually post updates and continually to continually try to push their audience to their fundraiser. And so in terms of like length of time, you know, it really just depends on what you’re fundraising for. Obviously, if it’s something that’s very timely, like a car accident, like the funds are usually all raised within the first few weeks, but if it’s something more long-term and ongoing, let’s say for I think of like the time’s up fundraiser that happened, I believe that was in the end of 2000, 19, early 2020. It’s still fundraising on our site. It, it just doesn’t get as much traction as it did not beginning, but it’s still live and it’s still fundraising for that need.

Adam

Brown:

And

one of the things Brittany, that you shared with us were some statistics on the demographics of GoFund me donors. And I thought there were some fascinating insights there around, you know, gen Z is launching more fundraisers and kind of who was giving and where they were giving. In fact, seeing donations to small businesses during the pandemic was, was really interesting. Anything that really surprised you in that, those wonderful 20, 21 survey results?

Brittany

Cabriales:

Yeah,

I think that, I think we all know that gen Z is very purpose driven and they believe in supporting causes that they believe in. But I think to see the rate at which they are giving back and trying to create change was just, it was, it was, it was amazing to see it’s, it’s beautiful to know that this younger generation is just as engaged and if not more so wanting to do good in the world. So that was like really great to see

Jay

Baer:

Brett,

one thing I want to ask you about is do you and your team also handle social care customer service for fundraisers and donors in social media, or is that a separate kind of customer service facing team?

Brittany

Cabriales:

That's

a different team, but we, we do, obviously, as we’re doing our social listening and looking through the, do our daily tags, we always look for people that need assistance and people that need care. And we kick them over to our customer support team usually takes good care of them.

Jay

Baer:

If

I recall correctly, you got your start in customer support which is sort of the department of empathy among others. Do you, do you think that is a disproportionately good background for what you’re doing today?

Brittany

Cabriales:

I

do. I, I think that coming up through the customer care department, really one, it gave me great insights into the platform itself. Like just knowing how everything works on the and then also just the you’re very customer facing there as well. So knowing what people are going through, being empathetic just, it is a very sensitive job. Like there are a lot of people going through some really hard things, so it’s always just being mindful of everyone’s situation. I think that’s always a great background.

Jay

Baer:

I'm

also under the impression that you were on the United States, national ultimate Frisbee team. Was there a fundraiser for ultimate Frisbee on GoFund mate? That’s what I really needed now.

Brittany

Cabriales:

Well,

I wasn’t on the national team, but I do know some of the girls who play there there have been fundraisers for ultimate Frisbee related teams. A couple of years ago. I actually started one for the team that I played on and I was able to raise a couple thousand dollars to, to help us get to nationals. So that was fun.

Jay

Baer:

You

were also a basketball three point shooting champion, a record that still stands. Is that, is that also true?

Brittany

Cabriales:

As

far as I know, it still stands in high school I made nine three-pointers in a game. So I have my little placard up on the, up on the wall at my high school.

Jay

Baer:

That's

a lot of 3.7 points any level. And it’s very, very nice. Yeah.

Brittany

Cabriales:

Very

nice. I love sports. If you can’t tell already

Jay

Baer:

You're

living the dream. One of the things that you said in the pre-show, I just want to call out to our audience cause it really, it just really encapsulated, I think your perspective as a person and what you do at GoFund me I was a little shook by it, actually. It was, it’s just so good. It really caused me to, to copy and paste, which I never do said every cause is important because it’s important to at least one person. What does that mean to you?

Brittany

Cabriales:

I

think that starting a fundraiser, it takes a lot of courage. Sometimes I think in our society asking for help can be frowned upon. And I think that if you are passionate about something and you care enough about something that starting a fundraiser and putting yourself out there and asking your friends and family like, Hey, this is important to me. I think, you know, 10 out of 10 times someone is going to be like, Hey, that’s important to me because it’s important to you. And I think that’s just the gist of what I was trying to get at is that every fundraiser on our platform matters and our, our goal is that every fundraiser would reach its goal. You know, if we had our say and so that’s what we’re really out here trying to do

Jay

Baer:

And

fantastic. That’s really great. Thank you, Brittany. Two questions that we ask everybody here on the show, we usually ask about ultimate Frisbee. So I guess it’s three questions, sorry. What one tip would you give somebody who’s looking to become a social pro?

Brittany

Cabriales:

I

would have to say just never stop learning. I constantly am just trying to read and listen and just get feedback and do all of that stuff. Just keep being curious. I would say it comes down to, because I think that if you stay curious, you drive your creativity. And I think that being creative is one of the most important things in this industry.

Jay

Baer:

All

right, here, here. I certainly agree with that. I mean, if you want a job where everything stays the same for a long period of time, this ain’t this, ain’t it friends. This is not the one For sure. Last question for Brittany Capri Ellis who runs social for go-fund me. Don’t forget to go fund me.com for all your fundraising needs, instagram.com go fund me that we talked about a moment ago, Brittany, if you could do a video call with any living person, who would it be?

Brittany

Cabriales:

I

am going to go out on a limb here and I am going to say Taylor swift. And I think there’s a, there’s a couple of reasons why I want, obviously her music is great too. I, she is just a master of marketing and branding, and I think that she has just done everything right in her career and just building this community of fans that are just so loyal, so loyal and just so supportive. And I think that I would learn so much from just being able to pick her brain.

Jay

Baer:

I

am also a Swifty that probably comes as a bit of a surprise to some of the social pros community, but I unabashedly am a fan of Taylor, swift music and, and the same thing bread. I completely agree her, her abilities as a marketer and a communicator are really, really top-notch and, you know, people take for granted like, yeah, she’s got 50 million Instagram followers and has the global community of, you know, tens of millions. Like that’s just no big deal just because you can sing songs. Like it’s a big deal. Like if, if everybody could do it, everybody would do it. Right. So it’s it’s pretty impressive, especially at, at that age. It’s it’s extraordinary. So good answer in my book, Adam, what is your view of Taylor swift?

Adam

Brown:

The

fact that I think Jay, you said it, it didn’t happen overnight that she has been laser-focused on this and crane. That brand has not making made missteps, which is frequent in that industry and, and navigated all the potential pitfalls. And, and I think carried herself as someone that many of her fans would, would look up to and ask prior to for professionally as well as personally. And I think that’s something we don’t see very often.

Jay

Baer:

Hopefully

our social pros committee will look up to and aspire to be Brittany Cabri LS. And you could do a lot worse. Brittany, thank you so much for being here on the program, delighted to speak with you and congratulations on all the success that GoFund me and, and hope it gets even bigger and helps even more people.

Brittany

Cabriales:

Thank

you so much for having me. It was blast and anytime I get to draw a Taylor Swift’s I’m going to be,

Jay

Baer:

You

found the right podcast. Thanks very much. We appreciate it. Friends. I’m Jay Baer from convince and convert. He is Adam Brown from Salesforce. We’ll be back next week with another exciting addition to what hopefully is your favorite podcast in the whole world. It is social pros. See them things.

CC

EP 497 – Edited (Completed 11/10/21)

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