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How Visit California Jumped into TikTok

Posted Under: Social Pros Podcast
Hosted By
10XMarketing

Anna Hrach

Convince & Convert
10XMarketing

Daniel Lemin

Convince & Convert
10XMarketing

Erika Lovegreen

ICUC Social
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To inquire to be or recommend a guest, please email leanna@convinceandconvert.com.


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Gwynne Spann, Director of Content Marketing at Visit California, joins this episode for a behind-the-scenes look at their TikTok strategy.

A Strategic Step into TikTokHow Visit California Jumped into TikTok

Gwynne Spann, Director of Content Marketing at Visit California, is on Social Pros to chat about TikTok, content marketing, audience targeting, and much more.
She shares the initial hesitancy she and her team had around TikTok and how her daughter convinced her to finally take the plunge.
While fairly new to TikTok, we get a glimpse into how Visit California approached the platform in the right way, prioritizing authenticity and a tailored strategy specific to TikTok.
Gwynne explains how the wider marketing strategy uses a lot of geographic targeting based on audience travel habits and how that influences the type of content they post. We also hear a bit about how Visit California works with travel partners, brand ambassadors, and Gwynne hints that we’ll likely see more influencer content in the future.

In This Episode:

  • 4:41 – How marketing to in-state residents differs from out-of-state audiences
  • 7:44 – How Visit California uses audience targeting
  • 11:28 – Why Visit California launched its own TikTok
  • 17:48 – Why TikTok is such a different beast than other social channels
  • 20:57 – How Visit California works with all its different business and venue partners
  • 24:30 – The success metrics that Visit California monitors
  • 26:56 – How Visit California does sentiment analysis
  • 31:02 – Gwynne explains what type of content is resonating the most on TikTok
  • 36:10 – The top piece of advice Gwynne has for those thinking of becoming a social pro

Quotes From This Episode:

When you look at our domestic audience or our longer-haul markets, we're going to serve them up some content that's going to be a little bit different. Click To Tweet
“It was this convergence of the timing was right, the research supported it. And we felt that we had some folks internally that might be able to help shape and lead the program. So that was really what turned the tide for me on TikTok.”
“You really have to recognize that you have to create content that’s very specific for the platform.”
“We have a whole group of ambassadors that are just California lovers.”

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Episode Transcript

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Gwynne

Spann:

She

said, you know, I actually see a reason for you to be on Tik TOK. I’m starting to see travel content on. And so she showed it to me and I would say it was this convergence because at the same time, our CEO, who is a great visionary as well you know, started to say, Hey, I’m, I’m aware of this platform. Should we be looking at it

Adam

Brown:

When

you need social media advice? And you have a 16 year old in the household, you need to go to the 16 year old as Gwynne just tells us Gwynne director of content marketing for visit California. You know, we all are trying to learn all of these new social media platforms. And authenticity is a message. I think that comes through today’s episode, how to use new new content and new channels. This was just a, a great, a great show. And, Gwynne, it’s such a delight.

Anna

Hrach:

Gwen

is such a delight and, you know, it’s, it’s so funny. Speaking of teenagers on Tik TOK, Adam, it was almost exactly a year ago that you, Jay and I talked to Maggie Thurman and she at the time was one of the first tech talk influencers. And now it’s really funny to kind of pick that conversation up with Gwen and her telling us about her daughter saying that same transition and helping them realize that tick-tock is now for brands. It’s really interesting to jump off a year later and just hear about how Gwen and visit California and her team have really been doing due diligence about jumping into tick talk the right way as a brand, being really thoughtful and finding the space that works for them. It’s a really cool episode to hear this whole process in like literally pick up the conversation a year later.

Adam

Brown:

It

is, and good talks a lot about a lot of her strategies and her team and how they go about doing this and how they did this during the pandemic. But this is a heavy tik tok episode. And I like that. And I like to how we’re seeing tik tok evolve much like we’ve seen with all the other social channels, so much great content in this episode.

Anna

Hrach:

So

much great content agree. And now we’re going to hear from Gwen about all matters of tik-tok and strategy. But before we jump in, we have something we want to talk to you about. Did you know that today 84% of marketers say customer expectations are changing their digital strategy? Despite the harsh challenges of the past year, marketers have found innovative ways to connect with their customers and each other. The seventh edition of the state of marketing report from Salesforce presents the insights of over 8,000 marketing leaders across 37 countries. This year’s report reveals the biggest priorities and challenges that will shape the future of marketing strategy in 2021 and beyond you can download your free copy today at Bitly slash state of marketing report. Again, that’s B I T dot L Y forward slash state of marketing report, all lower case. And now let’s hear from Gwen span, director of content marketing for visit California

Adam

Brown:

[Inaudible]
Adam

Brown:

For

the past 16 years, you have had an inkling to visit California. Gwen spann has probably been involved in that decision making process, Gwen, it is great to have you on the show. You have to tell everyone what is visit California and how do you get us and how do you drive us to come to your beautiful state?

Gwynne

Spann:

Well,

thank you Adam, for that wonderful introduction. And it is a real opportunity and a true pleasure for us to market the great state of California. And that’s really what my organization does. So our whole goal is to get people who are thinking about vacation, to think about doing it in California, and eventually come here and explore what our state has to offer, which is an awful lot, which is why probably I’ve been able to stay at the job for 16 years, because there is just a heck of a lot to talk about.

Adam

Brown:

California

is such a huge state. I I’m here residing in Texas. So I know the story and drill about large states. I’m assuming most of what you’re doing is to bring out of state tourists to the state is anything you’re doing about marketing and promoting to in-state Californians to either stay in state or to go head from LA to San Francisco or to head up north or, or to go to different parts of your, of your beautiful zone.

Gwynne

Spann:

That

is a really good question. And had you asked that of me pre pandemic, you would’ve gotten a different answer. Our, we were formed really to focus on out-of-state visitors and international to get them to come to California. But then when the pandemic happened and I think probably many people know that California was, was pretty locked down. One of the things we realized is that we couldn’t really market out California, right? We didn’t want to be seen as trying to pull people in at that time. And so during the pandemic, we still wanted people to be aware of us and know us and love us and love the brand that we have. But we started to switch the idea of marketing in-state and to take Californians to places around the state that maybe they hadn’t gone to. I mean, we are such a massive state and you will find a lot of Californians haven’t really properly explored it.

Gwynne

Spann:

So

we did switch a lot of the marketing that we were doing at the time to focus on in state. And you know, my role at visit California is overseeing all of the own channels. So it’s kind of the whole soup to nuts of website and social and the news and podcast and kind of everything outside of the advertising space that the sun touches is, is kind of the, the domain that, that we oversee or my team oversees. And so we were able to do a lot of really fun content extensions to try to move people around the state and try to get them to realize that, Hey, maybe I don’t really know Los Angeles, like I thought I did, and maybe I want to check it out, or, you know, same thing for San Francisco or you’re Rica you know, up in the north part of the state.

Gwynne

Spann:

So

we did, we did get to switch things a bit from a marketing mix standpoint and it was a fun and exciting opportunity. And now we’re still doing both. So kind of where we are with things is, is continuing to focus on out of state and starting to get back into international now that we think international travelers going to be able to come back in soon, but we are not leaving our in-state audience high and dry. We’re going to still continue to talk to them and encourage them to visit their own state.

Adam

Brown:

I'm

assuming that the content and the messaging is probably different in some ways, for those who are in-state versus out-of-state versus as you just said, international, talk a little bit about targeting and are you using different kinds of targeting tactics in social media to, to message different people with different messages based on pure geography?

Gwynne

Spann:

Yeah,

for, for sure. And I think this goes back to you know, when we started our social media programs, way, way back when, when, you know, social media was kind of nascent we actually worked pretty closely with convince and convert and with Jay to talk about how we wanted to handle our social media, especially our, our social media out of state. And, and one of the things that, you know, Jay talked to us about and has always stuck with me is really understanding the consumer, what are their questions? What are their friction points? What is their knowledge base that getting in the head of the consumer first and then developing your strategy from there. And so, because of that, I think you can look at the familiarity with California. You know, first at the international is much less familiar, so the questions and what they want, see what they know their perceptions of California are going to be different.

Gwynne

Spann:

And

so we try to speak to those by, you know, answering any questions that they have on my, about international travel to California. They generally have a longer vacation time. And so we want to create content and promote content that is you know, perhaps road trip that takes two weeks, right. Because they’re not going to be flying over from London and wanting to stay for the weekend. So we want to want to serve them content that is is gonna match that their their travel time. You know, when you look at our domestic audience, we have kind of our longer home markets, we’re going to serve them up some content. That’s going to be a little bit different. Similarly, if they’re coming from New York you know, they might want some different content, especially if they’re kind of urban, perhaps they’re looking for more of a rural getaway.

Gwynne

Spann:

And

so we might showcase some of our rural parts of California versus the, the drive market, you know, and one of the things that we did coming out of the pandemic was to actually create content that if you’re coming from say Seattle or Las Vegas or Portland, we’re going to give you road trips that maybe even give you a couple of stops outside of California, so that as you drive in, you know, what to see, you know, and in the locations that are near to California, and then once you get into the state, what to see here. So we, we do do quite a bit of targeting you know, based on, on geography for sure. Because it just makes sense,

Anna

Hrach:

Gwen.

I know that as you had mentioned, you know, the pandemic kind of shook things up, and obviously you have this very complex web of audiences with so many different needs, as Adam mentioned, and you talked about California is such a vast, diverse state, so many different things to do so many different people to message to, and really help them. So obviously the pandemic really shook things up, but then of course, to shake things up even further along comes tick talk, which by the way, congratulations for officially launching visit California on Tik TOK. As of right now, we’re speaking at the beginning of October and you just launched about a week ago. So huge, huge, huge first congrats. That’s amazing. Second since you’ve been with visit California for 16 years, I’ve used, as you had mentioned, you have helped them join Facebook when it first launched. And then of course, Twitter, but it’s been quite some time since brands have really had such a new, unique, very diverse and just different channel to launch on. So I’m curious over the course of your history with visit California and launching on different social channels, how did tech talk really shake things up? And, and why did you decide now is the time to launch?

Gwynne

Spann:

Yeah.

you’re you are right about that, about it being in a new and different platform and, and absolutely right about kind of the growth of, of social you know, over time. And we’ve always been a little bit, or we’ve always been a little bit reticent to jump into any new social application or any application in general, because we’re always thinking about resources. We are a relatively small team internally. We do have incredible partner agencies that we work with. And they are the ones who help make a lot of what we do and what our strategy is come to life. But we know that that’s going to cost, you know, a new platform is going to cost resources human capital and capital. And so we are very judicious about it. So I’ve been aware of tip-top for awhile. And especially because I have three kids one who just turned 16 another one who is 12 and a half, and then another who’s 10, but it was really the, you know, the 16 or 16 year old.

Gwynne

Spann:

And

I have conversations about life and work, et cetera. And for quite a while, she was telling me, Hey, mom, I know you’re like trying to figure out to talk, and if you should be on it, you shouldn’t be on it. And so for quite some time, she was, she was saying that, but then at some point in the pandemic, and I think it was pretty early on, she said, you know, I actually see a reason for you to be on Tik TOK. I’m starting to see travel content on Tik TOK. And so she showed it to me and I would say it was this convergence because at the same time, our CEO, who is a great visionary as well you know, started to say, Hey, I’m, I’m aware of this platform. Should we be looking at it? And so with my daughter, and of course our CEO, I started to evaluate it more.

Gwynne

Spann:

And

then finally my daughter convinced me to get on the platform myself because I hadn’t gone on. And we spent, I would say the first day, probably about two hours just going through videos and getting my, for you page set up and you know, getting, trying to make my algorithm right for me. And I started to really understand the platform and see the value in it and saving credible California related travel content and just travel content in general, that was on it. So I started to think that, you know, Hey, this may be a good platform for us to expand to, but we don’t do anything. You know, as I said, we have to think about resources. We have to think about, you know, timing and we have to make sure that we’re not getting into social for social sake. You know, that has been one of the things that I’ve always been really careful about.

Gwynne

Spann:

And,

you know, in this position, I feel like there are always people who will push you into one social platform or another, you know, like, Hey, we have to be on Snapchat. And my, my feeling, you know, especially in the early days of Snapchat was, you know, we don’t have the resources to build a femoral content. Like that’s just not our, our lane. And so that was not a platform that we really engaged in outside of doing some, some paid advertising. But with this, I started to see the value in it. And we started to do some research, which is the other thing that we always do is make sure that there is some, there, there from a demographic standpoint, we know that parents are talking to their kids about where they want to go. In fact, 80% of parents based on research that we’ve done will consult their children about their travel plans to one degree or another.

Gwynne

Spann:

And

so we wanted to make sure that we were getting in front of that demographic, that younger demographic, we want to also build an affinity amongst that demographic for California for later, when they do have purchasing power. And we also know that during the pandemic, an awful lot of folks outside of that demographic that may be like me also got onto tick talk as well. And so we can continue to reach them with our content. So, you know, again, it was this convergence of the timing was right. The research supported it. And we felt that we had some folks internally that might be able to help shape and lead the program. So so that was really what, what turned the tide for me on Tik TOK

Anna

Hrach:

Going,

I’m super curious, because like you’ve been talking about, we’ve heard from other brands as well, where in the early days of social media, obviously, you know, when Facebook and Twitter were first launching brands were like, well, let’s just jump on and see how it goes and test the waters. But now it feels like, and I don’t know if it’s just because of all the experience we have accumulated as social pros or if it’s just because Tik TOK is so different, but it really feels like brands are being much more thoughtful, much more strategic about joining tick talk. And even as he mentioned all the steps that it took to even get you to consider the channel, I’m just curious, do you notice that shift? Like, do you, do you know why maybe things feel so much more thoughtful and strategic towards tech talk or why you all had to consider it so much more carefully than the early days of Facebook? I’m just curious, because we’ve been hearing the same approach from pretty much every brand out there.

Gwynne

Spann:

Yeah.

I think Tik TOK is just a different beast and, and where we’ve gone in social, I feel like social has just been really ramping in this way of continuing to create beautiful content. I mean, especially when you think about Instagram in particular you know, really developed content, we kind of know what we’re doing in those platforms and we’ve got a formula and it just seems like they all have a little bit of that same formula. It’s got to be super thoughtful. It’s gotta be super polished, right. Like it just is, you know, again, it’s, it’s formulaic in that way. And then along comes tick talk, which is just kind of anything goes. And if you are following that formula, that we’re all so used to, you’re going to get punished on Tik TOK. And one of my real worries about going into the platform was that I don’t want to go in with content that is going to get our brand slammed.

Gwynne

Spann:

Right.

Like if we go on and all of a sudden we are seen as inauthentic, we’re going to be called out. And so given that it’s like, okay, well, if we need to make sure we’re creating content, that’s authentic for this platform, then one, we need to understand the platforms. So there’s going to be a time involved there. And then two, we have to make sure that we’re getting the right kind of content creators to get onto the platform. And then there was talk with our agencies. Okay. You know, who, who knows about Tik TOK, who’s been on the platform who can give us advice on it. And in the end you know, one of the things that I found was that a lot of our agencies would say, well, we’re, we know how to do Instagram reels. We’re playing, we’re playing around with Instagram reels.

Gwynne

Spann:

So,

you know, we feel that we could get onto, onto tip talk and do content. And that was a huge red flag for me. Was this feeling of like anybody who says, well, we’re, we’re doing Instagram reels. You know, I feel like they don’t quite know that, you know, Tik TOK is, is different and that just won’t work. So you really have to recognize that you have to create content that’s very specific for the platform. And that was what gave me a lot of trepidation about it was just, you know, knowing that this is going to be a time and resource sock.

Adam

Brown:

Gwen,

let’s talk a little bit about that, about that, that content for Tik TOK, because we agree completely with you. You’ve, you’ve got to create precise content for that channel for that particular audience. But you mentioned working with creators, probably working with influencers, probably have partners. And you know, what I would say is a unquote customers of visit California, the the, the entrepreneurs and the, the travel and hospitality you know, restaurant owners, all those types of things. How do you work with all those disparate groups to make sure again, that the content is authentic, make sure that if you do showcase a particular restaurant or establishment, that you don’t make your other restaurants and establishments and hotels and attractions upset that that has to be almost a job in itself.

Gwynne

Spann:

Absolutely.

it is a job itself. And, you know, I think this is where kind of having history within visit California and working with the industry has, has helped me pay off or has paid off for me. Because I understand, I understand the needs of the businesses to a certain extent, right? I’m not in their shoes completely, but I know certainly that they want amplification of, of what’s going on in their spaces. And I have to take a longitudinal approach, right. We try to make sure that we are highlighting all our business segments over time that, you know, the, the key businesses over time. I mean, one thing that helps is the fact that our brand is based on diversity. And so that’s diversity of the people of California and other states, the experiences, diversity, the businesses. And so in order for me to do my job, I really need to showcase that diversity of California.

Gwynne

Spann:

But

I do try to make sure if we’re highlighting one attraction in a publication one year, and they’re getting kind of a little bit of a, of a bigger treatment or on the website, what have you, that we’re going to highlight another maybe in the following year. So you may, there may be not be parody in the instance, but over time there should be parody. And I look at that across our publications, our podcast you know, all, all of that own channel part of it also, it helps when they’ve got good stories to tell. And so we work with the industry to make sure that they’re giving us their story ideas. We have an editorial board that has members of all of the visit California team, as well as our agencies who can listen to any of the pitches that come in from, from our industry and determine what has a value for the consumer, because as a B to C marketing engine, which is, you know, what I am fortunate enough to do, I always want to make sure that it’s relevant and useful to the consumer.

Gwynne

Spann:

That's

my first goal is to make sure that it makes sense for the consumers. So, you know, it’s that intersection of what’s right for the consumer what’s right for the industry. What’s a good story that we get to tell. And then when it comes to tick tock, I mean, because it’s such a fledgling channel you know, and, and we want to start growing it in the organic space. We’re doing a lot of content creation internally, but we are starting to work with a couple of our industry members that we worked with in the past, who we know have great content that we might be able to use in turn into a video, and we can work with them on the story idea. And if it’s not successful, come no harm, no foul. Right. But we’re just really testing the waters because quite honestly, we’re in a test and learn phase with this new platform, with this new channel.

Adam

Brown:

So

you’re creating this great content. You’re putting it up on Tik TOK. People are coming to California in droves, coincidence span, director of content marketing for visit California, how then to you show your customers. And it could be those, those organizations we’re talking about. It could be the governor’s office. It could be the mayors of these individual towns. How do you show them the success that you are having that has to be a tricky kind of part of this rubric

Gwynne

Spann:

For

sure. And it is really metrics-based is a big part of it is we are making sure that we’re measuring incremental travel. We have a research firm that that works to do that, and is looking at our, our different channels in particular, the advertising that we do. And then also that the value of the website. And we know that the folks that are visiting the website are incredibly value. They stay longer, they spend more when they come to California. So we try to do as much quantifying as possible, but it’s challenging, right? Because we’re not selling the room nights. You know, that’s not coming from us or we’re not, you know booking the restaurants. So we also have to just show you know, sometimes that’s where moderation comes in is that if we can show anecdotally how consumers are gravitating towards the content in the social space through moderation, that helps us to, if somebody says, Hey, you know, that’s beautiful, man.

Gwynne

Spann:

I

want to go there, right? Like, that’s one of those pieces that we can show to the, to the industry. And then also we have this kind of metric that we made up that we call partner handoffs. That’s on our website. So if say someone’s coming from one of our social pieces, they’re getting onto the website and they click off, you know, on one of the links that we have, we call that a partner handoff. And so we’re showing our industry that, Hey, this content, we are not trying to get them just to stay on our site in depth in LA. Our goal is to move them through to you, as we say, move them down the path to booking. But that really is, is our ultimate goal. And so we share those numbers with our industry as well.

Anna

Hrach:

Just

curious if you’re also handing off some of that sentiment analysis and, you know, some of the comments, because it feels like, you know, I know as you mentioned, that’s such a, a tricky situation to be in, for visit California because you are responsible for, you know, driving people, but then you don’t actually have ultimate control over, you know, the booking numbers itself. But obviously there’s a lot of sentiment that you can track. And just curious if you’re handing that off to others as well, or how closely you’re tracking that and what that

Gwynne

Spann:

For

sure. We do, we have again, our research team does an amazing job of doing sentiment analysis, kind of writ large. So they have a larger research program where they’re looking at perceptions around California, but then we are also working very closely with our agency in particular. You know, we, we work with Meredith out of New York and they do a lot of social listening and helping for us to see, you know, what people are saying, especially in times of crisis. And unfortunately we’ve had a number of those. And so we want to get a sense of, of consumer sentiment. And, and they’re very helpful for that. And then our moderation agency, which is ICU and they do a fantastic job of moderating and really rolling up what consumers are saying, not only on our own channels, but also they’re looking at places like TripAdvisor and trying to get us, give us a sense of, you know, what are, what are consumers talking about? What are the worries? And, you know, when we go back to one of the questions you asked me earlier, that’s where you can actually really start to see stratification of consumers by where they’re located. And that helps us as we develop content for each of those markets. Tripadvisor is really a key in that.

Adam

Brown:

Do,

is your team responsible for kind of looking at those reviews and ratings and responding to them, or is that another part of the visit California organization?

Gwynne

Spann:

We

don’t play as much in that space. We try to help our industry understand the importance of reputation management and the importance of engaging there. One interesting thing that we’ve found is if we, as a brand start to jump in there, we get called out on it, like consumers on TripAdvisor are they can be merciless and they’re like, Hey, no, this, this is not the place for you. This is for us to talk to each other. And so we find we actually, and we find that we have a really nice group of California advocates that are doing the work on our behalf and are answering the questions and saying, you know, no, it’s not smoky down here because that, you know, if, you know, unfortunately it’s, it’s a fire that, that fire is up in the Northern part of the state. So San Diego is clear for example. So we have a whole a group of, you know, ambassadors that are just California lovers. And we’re so grateful that they’re out there because they really help to communicate, to advise the consumers on that platform,

Adam

Brown:

Having

a group of, of evangelist or ambassadors is so critical. And it sounds like when you have cultivated, you know, those, those types of, of, of enthusiastic participants over your past past 16 years, I’ve got one last question for you until I ask you the big two questions. It’s great to talk to a guest like you, who’s doing so much research and you, and you’re looking at all this, you’re looking at the geo information. You’re looking at what content works, your emphasis on authenticity. We so agree with you here on the social pros show, but I have a question kind of related to that, that I think our audiences is also wrestling with. And that is what type of content seems to be resonating the most for visit California on talk. We already covered authenticity, but is it, is it celebrity God dead? Is it talking about cities? Is it talking about nature? Is it showcasing people and families doing things? What, what seems to be getting the most engagement here in 2021?

Gwynne

Spann:

Well,

so far, you know, again, the channels pretty nascent. And so we, you know, as I said, are, are in that test and learn space, but it’s been really fun to see. And one thing we found is that when we put out our content for, you know, the first couple of weeks we had you know, some content that was, you know, three beautiful places to go and, and kind of this rural part of California and Eureka we had our intro video that just kind of highlights things, but it seems like the one that people are gravitating to right now is a video about the 12 hours in San Francisco. So, which is interesting to see that they’re looking for something that is or interested in something that is a little bit more proscriptive in, in showcasing the city. I mean, granted, there’s a really cool mini golf course that we’re highlighting and tip talks all about niche audiences.

Gwynne

Spann:

So

perhaps that might be part of it. But I would say that one is far and away and, and so far we’ve actually stayed away from a person because we don’t know really what the brand and face of tick talks going to be for visit California. And so we’re not really showcasing any one person or any one celebrity that may be in our future. Working with influencers on the platform is probably in our future as well. But right now we’re just using some of the content that we’re creating in-house or getting through, you know, potentially a partnership that we might have, or even looking at working with some of the creators through the tech talk marketplace and see what they might be able to do.

Anna

Hrach:

That's

awesome. I love, again, just going back to like the super thoughtful, strategic approach about, you know, and also testing in, in launching and seeing what people are resonant are resonant. What’s resonating with people and how they’re responding. I’m really a big fan of this. Everybody you really need to go follow, visit California on Tik TOK right now, because you can actually see them testing all these things in real time. You can see how they’re rolling things out. It’s a really, really cool like strategy in action account, at least from a social nerd, like all of us. I think we can all agree. That’s going to be really fun going to see what you and the team come up with hearing a little bit behind some of the strategy, hearing about the approach, hearing about the things you’re willing on the future. So I’m super excited about where tech talk is going to go. Gwen, as Adam mentioned, you know, we could sit here and talk about tech talk all day. First off, I just want to thank you for being on the show. I’m super excited that you were here and we were able to really dig into tick-tock and visit California strategies. So thank you.

Gwynne

Spann:

Oh,

you are so welcome. It was really, really fun. I, I love the work that I do. I love the program. I’m a California native I’m fifth generation, California. And if you can believe that some of us actually exist. So you know, talking about what we have in this state is, is certainly near and dear to my heart. And you know, in representing this organization is it’s kind of a, a dream job for me, which is probably why I’ve been here for 16 years.

Anna

Hrach:

Yes.

I would say dream job would be right. Especially 16 years. And speaking of dream, dream job Gwen, you’re actually looking for a resource for social. So social pros who want to apply, how should they get ahold of you?

Gwynne

Spann:

I

would say just message me on LinkedIn. So I think that’s probably the easiest way that we haven’t posted a, yet we will be posting posting it in the coming weeks. But just shoot me a message on LinkedIn. And I can make sure that you get the job opportunity when we do get it posted. But yes it is. We’re looking for someone who’s got some serious social media chops and has a passion for California perhaps, and would love to bring them onto the team.

Anna

Hrach:

I

would say that this audience would be the right place to find someone, the looping art, everybody said, go follow visit California and TechTalk and all the other channels. And then also penguin if you’re interested and also that dream job status as well. But going in the meantime, of course, we cannot let you go until we ask you these same two questions that we have asked all 492 guests before you, are you ready for the big two? I

Gwynne

Spann:

Think

so.

Anna

Hrach:

All

right. So question number one is what piece of advice would you give to anyone who wants to become a social pro?

Gwynne

Spann:

For

me, it distills down into the idea of just staying curious, like you’ve got to stay curious, especially with social in terms of, you know, staying curious about the new platforms and it can be easy to get jaded sometimes in this space. And I think if you’re curious about it, it, it tends to stave off some of that, you know, hard exterior that we can get as working professionals and just know that we don’t know at all. And I think that’s, that’s the other piece of it is like my gosh, there is so much to learn. So it’s, you know, if you come with that mindset, I think it, it is easy to stay curious because there’s always something to learn. There’s always something new it’s, it’s exciting and it’s fun.

Anna

Hrach:

A

hundred percent. Yeah. It’s so easy. So easy to just look at one awful comment and let it tough in your exterior, but love the staying curious comment. All right. So big question. Number two, if you could have a video call with any living person, who would it be and why?

Gwynne

Spann:

And

you’re the smartest coming. So a lot about it. And even last night I was talking to my kids about it and of course my daughter is like, well, it’s gotta be someone from the dream SNP. And if you know what I’m talking about, you know, what I’m talking about. And I was like, yeah, sweetie. Now she also told me I was not allowed to say that, but you know how that goes with kids. And I thought long and hard about, you know, certain people I’ve always wanted, you know, to have a deeper conversations with you know, from, from working professionals to, you know, Julie Andrews to Taylor swift. I mean, like just various people, but a lot of the people that I would have thought to have conversations with seemed like I would be nervous and it would be work.

Gwynne

Spann:

And

I’m at a point right now that anything that outside of work seems like work is not something that I really want to do. So like many people, I ended up getting a, to the pandemic my other outside, I don’t think, I, I know you guys leaderboard names. We need to talk about that after, but I, and, and I also teach spinning outside of of my work that I do for visit California. So I knew that I would go a little stir crazy if I didn’t do something with all the gyms close. So I got my Peloton and I have a really kind of fall in love with Christine Derrick Cole. She has been such an incredible just motivator and like helps me get my head on straight and also plays really good music. So I would love to talk to her about all things, Peloton and all things spin and all things, music and just have a really fun conversation, not, not work, but just a good time. And that’s right now what I’m looking for.

Anna

Hrach:

I

agree. I love her. I love she puts together some really fantastic new wave playlists as well. But Adam, is that, is she one of your favorites too?

Adam

Brown:

She's

in the top five.

Anna

Hrach:

All

right. We’re going to have to have a whole separate social pros episode on just ranking Peloton instructors as well as their social presences.

Gwynne

Spann:

Yeah.

Right. And that is another figure that I think to talk about. I mean, my God, there’s people going from just kind of, you know, where they were to where they are would be an incredible conversation.

Adam

Brown:

No,

I love that answer Gwen. And one of the most thoughtful answers to, I think about that work and life balance and, and using your, your one get out of jail free dinner with someone card on the right side of the of, of that, of that balance sheet.

Anna

Hrach:

I

love it. Fabulous, fabulous answers, Gwen. I love it. Thank you so much again for being on Gwen, just such a, such a treat and such a joy to always talk to you.

Gwynne

Spann:

Thank

you guys for having me. It was a really good way to spend some time. Thank you. Okay.

Anna

Hrach:

Love

it. Also to everyone else, listening and tuning in, he is Adam Brown from Salesforce and I am Anna from convince and convert. And we want to thank you so much for being here too. We really appreciate that you all tune in with us week after week, and we look forward to continuing our conversations next time on what we hope is your favorite podcast in the whole wide world, the social pros podcast.

EP

493 – Edited (Completed 10/14/21)

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