Content Marketing, Digital Marketing, Blogging and Content Creation, PR 20

4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters

You have to pitch bloggers differently than reporters. The marvelous Dave Fleet writes a lot about this topic, and Chris Brogan produced a terrific, straightforward post about blogger pitching recently.

Here’s my thoughts on some advanced blogger pitching ideas and the key differences between bloggers and reporters.

Influence is Made Not Born

Guess how many readers this blog had originally?

If you guessed zero, you’re right. Help yourself to some free social media tools. Seriously, I had to convince my Mom to read Convince & Convert, and my wife still doesn’t tune in.

bloggers reporters 300x284 4 Ways Bloggers Differ From ReportersAnd the truth is that every blog started the same way. Brogan. Mashable. MarketingProfs. Solis. All of them started with zero readers, and now are influential (at least in the context of our own little marketing/PR/social media world).

Doing It My Way

The fact that bloggers all have to climb this mountain is an important difference between bloggers and journalists. Remember that bloggers’ influence is derived from their own ability and moxie, whereas journalists’ influence is in large measure derived via the outlet they represent. If you’re a writer for the Washington Post, you have influence. But if one day you aren’t, your influence transfers to the guy sitting at your old desk. For all but the celebrity journalists, influence is as portable as health care – not at all.

And unlike the journalists, writing is usually not a full-time job for most bloggers. Thus, bloggers are typically inveterate multi-taskers that protect their time like a pissed off goose with a nest full of goslings.

That’s why bloggers get so irked about ham-handed pitches from clueless PR folks that are still in the “harvest email address and send bulk releases” school of outreach. It wastes time, which is a commodity that’s in short supply for bloggers – who don’t have any readers unless they make it happen.

The Influence Economy

Most bloggers are not compensated directly for their writing. Sure, they may have some ads or affiliate links on the site (although I personally abhor it), but unless the blog gets serious traffic, the ability to monetize eyeballs is limited, indeed.

By way of example, let’s take a look at this very blog. I’m on track to generate 30,000 page views in January, which would be a record (sincere thanks to every single one of you, even Mom). Setting aside affiliate or Google Adwords opportunities, and working strictly with conventional online advertising economics, the max I could make on this blog monthly from your eyeballs is about $450. (30,000 page views X 3 ads per page X $5 per thousand ad impressions). I spend about 8 hours per week on this blog between writing, commenting, tweaking, etc. – and that’s a lot less than some of my peers. But for me, my hourly take for blogging would be $14.

That’s why I don’t blog for money per se, nor do most other bloggers. But blogging is incredibly important to my business because it generates social media speaker opportunities, and social media consulting projects. Thus, every reader of this blog is a potential client, or a connection to a potential client – as well as a potential colleague, friend, drinking buddy or fantasy football league-mate.

So even though I’m not in the advertising business, traffic absolutely matters to me, as it does to all bloggers.

There are two currencies that matter to bloggers – traffic and influence. When you’re pitching bloggers, find a way for your interaction with them to generate one of those two things (or both), and you’ll have yourself quite an effective pitch.

What generates traffic and influence for bloggers? Access and information. Don’t just send a blogger a write-up of your nifty marketing program. Give the blogger access to your metrics and ask if they’d like to create a post analyzing your ROI. Provide an interview with the customers that participated in the program. Link to the bloggers’ post from your corporate Web site.

It’s not about exclusives and embargoes. It’s not about doing all the work FOR the reporter, so he or she can hit a deadline with minimal effort. With bloggers, it’s about co-creating the content WITH the blogger, helping he or she package the content in a way that’s unusual, memorable and impactful. That’s what drives traffic, and that’s what drives influence.

Recap of the 4 Main Differences Between Reporters and Bloggers

  • Bloggers are self-made
  • Bloggers are time-starved
  • Bloggers need traffic and influence
  • Bloggers want to co-create content with you

What other differences do you see?

(photo by BitchBuzz)

Related
  • danusiaj

    Bloggers want people to comment on their blogs with relevant/helpful/observational comments as well as the odd virtual “pat on the back”.

    Trying to sell us suede boots/illegal substances or directing us off to a dodgy website – not required.

  • http://www.rentokil.com/blog danusiaj

    Bloggers want people to comment on their blogs with relevant/helpful/observational comments as well as the odd virtual “pat on the back”.

    Trying to sell us suede boots/illegal substances or directing us off to a dodgy website – not required.

  • AbbieF

    Jason — excellent post. I especially like the differences between reporters and bloggers. As a pr professional it is easy to consider the two one in the same. Sometimes they are, but blogging is a very different animal than traditional news coverage. And as someone who pitches the media on a regular basis this is a good reminder. Thanks (and I look forward to seeing you Monday at SMAZ).

  • AbbieF

    Jason — excellent post. I especially like the differences between reporters and bloggers. As a pr professional it is easy to consider the two one in the same. Sometimes they are, but blogging is a very different animal than traditional news coverage. And as someone who pitches the media on a regular basis this is a good reminder. Thanks (and I look forward to seeing you Monday at SMAZ).

  • AbbieF

    Jason — excellent post. I especially like the differences between reporters and bloggers. As a pr professional it is easy to consider the two one in the same. Sometimes they are, but blogging is a very different animal than traditional news coverage. And as someone who pitches the media on a regular basis this is a good reminder. Thanks (and I look forward to seeing you Monday at SMAZ).

  • http://twitter.com/lisadiaz lisadiaz

    Bloggers can and should use their own personal voice, whereas journalists sometimes have to separate themselves from their story.

  • http://twitter.com/lisadiaz lisadiaz

    Bloggers can and should use their own personal voice, whereas journalists sometimes have to separate themselves from their story.

  • http://ariwriter.com Ari Herzog

    Whoa Jason! As a former fulltime freelance writer who has bylined hundreds of articles for daily newspapers, you're making some blanket statements here. Many reporters share those four traits you list at the bottom of your post; I can think of numerous veteran reporters who have little free time and prefer co-creating content vs publishing the copy received.

  • http://ariwriter.com Ari Herzog

    Whoa Jason! As a former fulltime freelance writer who has bylined hundreds of articles for daily newspapers, you're making some blanket statements here. Many reporters share those four traits you list at the bottom of your post; I can think of numerous veteran reporters who have little free time and prefer co-creating content vs publishing the copy received.

  • christinaklenotic

    Hi, Jay! I absolutely agree. I wrote a similar post about how blogger outreach differs from media outreach here: http://dannybrown.me/2009/08/20/blogger-outreac

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    True, it's a blanket comparison. And of course there are traditional reporters that prefer co-creation, and with budget cuts I'm sure their time is incredibly limited at present. But, I maintain that there are several important differences in psychology, training (few bloggers have journalism degrees), and business models that make bloggers a different breed of cat. I'd argue that your exceptions prove the rule.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    True, it's a blanket comparison. And of course there are traditional reporters that prefer co-creation, and with budget cuts I'm sure their time is incredibly limited at present. But, I maintain that there are several important differences in psychology, training (few bloggers have journalism degrees), and business models that make bloggers a different breed of cat. I'd argue that your exceptions prove the rule.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    Yes Lisa. Thanks for the good comment. I was going to write a section about reporters having editors and bloggers not having editors, but took it out in the final draft. Thanks for mentioning it, as it is an important distinction.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    Yes Lisa. Thanks for the good comment. I was going to write a section about reporters having editors and bloggers not having editors, but took it out in the final draft. Thanks for mentioning it, as it is an important distinction.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    Thanks Abbie. Coming from you – a true PR pro that understands how the biz has changed – that's high praise indeed. Looking forward to seeing you Monday as well. Cheers!

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    Thanks Abbie. Coming from you – a true PR pro that understands how the biz has changed – that's high praise indeed. Looking forward to seeing you Monday as well. Cheers!

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    If I ever try to sell you suede boots, please feel free to leave a mean comment – here and on Twitter.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    If I ever try to sell you suede boots, please feel free to leave a mean comment – here and on Twitter.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    Fantastic Christina. I'll check it out. Anything that appears on Danny's site is high quality and worthwhile.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    Fantastic Christina. I'll check it out. Anything that appears on Danny's site is high quality and worthwhile.

  • http://www.WaxingUnLyrical.com Shonali Burke, ABC

    Jay, this is one of the freshest posts I've read on the difference between reporters and bloggers.

    I think Ari has a point about blanket statements, but in my experience, most “traditional” reporters do want all the information provided to them (and, quite frankly, the less “work” they have to do, the better), particularly as they become more and more strapped for resources. And I say this with several years of experience in working with MSM. The journos I find really interested in exploring their own angle to a story are the ones doing investigative reporting, and invariably they are also on the forefront of digital media, at least in their niche… which makes them, psychologically at least, similar to bloggers.

    I wonder if you have seen whether, as blogs and bloggers get larger or bigger, they seem to start behaving like “traditional” media? Just curious as to your experience.

  • http://www.WaxingUnLyrical.com Shonali Burke, ABC

    Jay, this is one of the freshest posts I've read on the difference between reporters and bloggers.

    I think Ari has a point about blanket statements, but in my experience, most “traditional” reporters do want all the information provided to them (and, quite frankly, the less “work” they have to do, the better), particularly as they become more and more strapped for resources. And I say this with several years of experience in working with MSM. The journos I find really interested in exploring their own angle to a story are the ones doing investigative reporting, and invariably they are also on the forefront of digital media, at least in their niche… which makes them, psychologically at least, similar to bloggers.

    I wonder if you have seen whether, as blogs and bloggers get larger or bigger, they seem to start behaving like “traditional” media? Just curious as to your experience.

  • toddlynch

    Nice post, Jay. Bloggers tend to write with a strong personal opinion about their topic whereas reporters are generally (depending on thier role) directed to report the news objectively. Additionally, bloggers post with the hope of starting a dialogue. Traditional reporting is a one way communication, although social media is quickly changing that dynamic. These things also impact what and how you pitch a blogger.

  • toddlynch

    Nice post, Jay. Bloggers tend to write with a strong personal opinion about their topic whereas reporters are generally (depending on thier role) directed to report the news objectively. Additionally, bloggers post with the hope of starting a dialogue. Traditional reporting is a one way communication, although social media is quickly changing that dynamic. These things also impact what and how you pitch a blogger.

  • jackmonson

    Jay – nice, thoughtful post!

    One thing is true for both bloggers and journalists:
    Whether PR pros are interested in reaching a blogger or a journalist (or any other influencer for that matter), they will be wasting their time if they continue to send out bulk releases rather than engage appropriate influencers one-on-one.

  • http://www.engage121.com/?src=JMB Jack Monson

    Jay – nice, thoughtful post!

    One thing is true for both bloggers and journalists:
    Whether PR pros are interested in reaching a blogger or a journalist (or any other influencer for that matter), they will be wasting their time if they continue to send out bulk releases rather than engage appropriate influencers one-on-one.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    Indeed Todd. That strikes at the heart of the “bloggers don't have an editor” comparison – which I almost included in this post. I believe that distinction is evaporating, however, as journalists write shorter, punchier, more opinionated pieces, and bloggers go with a more straight up approach.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    Indeed Todd. That strikes at the heart of the “bloggers don't have an editor” comparison – which I almost included in this post. I believe that distinction is evaporating, however, as journalists write shorter, punchier, more opinionated pieces, and bloggers go with a more straight up approach.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    High praise from you Shonali. Thank you very much. I do agree that as bloggers get bigger they start acting more like journalists. Less interested in comments, less opinionated.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    High praise from you Shonali. Thank you very much. I do agree that as bloggers get bigger they start acting more like journalists. Less interested in comments, less opinionated.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    Absolutely Jack. 1:1 is (and really always has been) the best approach.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    Absolutely Jack. 1:1 is (and really always has been) the best approach.

  • http://armystrongmom.blogspot.com/ jilliansmitty

    Here's my question: How do you BREAK INTO a conversation with bloggers about a potential story? You're supposed to build a relationship with a blogger before asking them for coverage, but typically as a PR person you don't have time to follow all the best blogs for all the industries of all your clients. And your clients want something now, not a year from now.

    Is there any way to just say “HEY, Mr. Blogger, here's my idea, here's how I think it's relevant to your audience, and maybe you could talk about it from X angle” ???

    From everything I've read online about trying to pitch to bloggers, it might as well say “don't even try,” or “here's the WRONG way to do it.”

    This is the first semblance of anything actually useful I've ever seen on the topic. But I need more. I would like to see an example of a good PR pitch to a blogger.

  • http://armystrongmom.blogspot.com/ jilliansmitty

    Here's my question: How do you BREAK INTO a conversation with bloggers about a potential story? You're supposed to build a relationship with a blogger before asking them for coverage, but typically as a PR person you don't have time to follow all the best blogs for all the industries of all your clients. And your clients want something now, not a year from now.

    Is there any way to just say “HEY, Mr. Blogger, here's my idea, here's how I think it's relevant to your audience, and maybe you could talk about it from X angle” ???

    From everything I've read online about trying to pitch to bloggers, it might as well say “don't even try,” or “here's the WRONG way to do it.”

    This is the first semblance of anything actually useful I've ever seen on the topic. But I need more. I would like to see an example of a good PR pitch to a blogger.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    Jillian thank you for a terrific comment. Indeed, I advise my clients (most of whom are PR firms) that they need to fundamentally change the way they build relationships. Indeed, you need to build a bridge with a blogger before you need it, not when you need it. That requires spending time each day pitching what needs to be pitched in the short-term, and commenting, tweeting, etc. to build bonds you may need to draw on down the road. Until PR agency management understands this fundamental shift, the mid-level and junior folks that have to do the actual pitching have one hand tied behind their backs.

    That said, if you have to pitch cold, focus on the traffic and influence difference I mentioned in the post. What can you give the blogger to help he/she craft a post that is different, interesting, noteworthy. Not just “this happened, want to write about it?”

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    Jillian thank you for a terrific comment. Indeed, I advise my clients (most of whom are PR firms) that they need to fundamentally change the way they build relationships. Indeed, you need to build a bridge with a blogger before you need it, not when you need it. That requires spending time each day pitching what needs to be pitched in the short-term, and commenting, tweeting, etc. to build bonds you may need to draw on down the road. Until PR agency management understands this fundamental shift, the mid-level and junior folks that have to do the actual pitching have one hand tied behind their backs.

    That said, if you have to pitch cold, focus on the traffic and influence difference I mentioned in the post. What can you give the blogger to help he/she craft a post that is different, interesting, noteworthy. Not just “this happened, want to write about it?”

  • http://armystrongmom.blogspot.com/ jilliansmitty

    Okay so if I'm pitching cold, is, say, reprinting the article on your business's blog as a guest entry and providing a link to the original on your website's 'news and events' type page (assuming you have a hook they'd want to write about) a decent return favor?

  • http://armystrongmom.blogspot.com/ jilliansmitty

    Okay so if I'm pitching cold, is, say, reprinting the article on your business's blog as a guest entry and providing a link to the original on your website's 'news and events' type page (assuming you have a hook they'd want to write about) a decent return favor?

  • tobybloomberg

    Nice reminder. Can I add one more of what is important to bloggers, at least to me? Value to my community.
    By the way .. where can I get Blogger Barbie ;-)

  • tobybloomberg

    Nice reminder. Can I add one more of what is important to bloggers, at least to me? Value to my community.
    By the way .. where can I get Blogger Barbie ;-)

  • http://www.grtaylor2photo.com GRTaylor2

    Jay- As someone who has just got serious about blogging thanks for the insight. As with everything else, I believe that by doing the right things and having an original voice my blog will start to gain traction and a following.

    Another difference between bloggers and journalists is also expertise in a particular subject. In my opinion a blogger that writes about a niche subject is perceived to have more insight on a topic than a journalist who writes assignment pieces for a publication. (Or am I off base?)

  • http://www.grtaylor2photo.com GRTaylor2

    Jay- As someone who has just got serious about blogging thanks for the insight. As with everything else, I believe that by doing the right things and having an original voice my blog will start to gain traction and a following.

    Another difference between bloggers and journalists is also expertise in a particular subject. In my opinion a blogger that writes about a niche subject is perceived to have more insight on a topic than a journalist who writes assignment pieces for a publication. (Or am I off base?)

  • http://twitter.com/oh_so_wideawake/statuses/8055097987 oh_so_wideawake (Jessy Cameron)

    Twitter Comment


    how fashion bloggers differ from reporters [link to post] thought provoking read for PR execs who pitch to bloggers as well as journos

    Posted using Chat Catcher

  • sahanaj

    Thanks for the tips/influence Jason! I'll be sure to spread the four points with my PR cohorts – although they don't fall into the 'clueless PR folks' category ;) Being able to offer a link from a corporate Web site is hard, especially because PR is often isolated from the happenings of the corporate site (silly!). There seems to always be this one Web master who controls everything online and getting anything up can be an uphill battle. But, I know that sometimes it helps for a blogger to know that you will merchandise the crap out of their post if they are willing to review your product, or talk about you, or join your cause….whatever it may be that you are asking of them (ultimately helping them with traffic and influence).

  • sahanaj

    Thanks for the tips/influence Jason! I'll be sure to spread the four points with my PR cohorts – although they don't fall into the 'clueless PR folks' category ;) Being able to offer a link from a corporate Web site is hard, especially because PR is often isolated from the happenings of the corporate site (silly!). There seems to always be this one Web master who controls everything online and getting anything up can be an uphill battle. But, I know that sometimes it helps for a blogger to know that you will merchandise the crap out of their post if they are willing to review your product, or talk about you, or join your cause….whatever it may be that you are asking of them (ultimately helping them with traffic and influence).

  • arikhanson

    Great post, Jay. I've done a fair amount of blogger outreach for my clients and the most important thing I've found is to always research bloggers inside out. Subscribe to the blog. Read. Follow them on Twitter. Comment on their blogs. Find out which posts draw more comments than others. Think about how you can provide a post idea the blogger will find interesting. In many cases, it's not even about “pitching”–it's about providing ideas.

    I will say I approach blogger outreach and media outreach in the same way in that both are based on building relationships. But, with blogger outreach there are many more options for creative approaches. I've found getting the blogger involved with the brand, campaign, process works pretty well, too. And, as with journalists, I try to make their lives easier. Provide photos, video and lists the blogger can use in a post they pen about your client's product or service.

    @arikhanson

  • arikhanson

    Great post, Jay. I've done a fair amount of blogger outreach for my clients and the most important thing I've found is to always research bloggers inside out. Subscribe to the blog. Read. Follow them on Twitter. Comment on their blogs. Find out which posts draw more comments than others. Think about how you can provide a post idea the blogger will find interesting. In many cases, it's not even about “pitching”–it's about providing ideas.

    I will say I approach blogger outreach and media outreach in the same way in that both are based on building relationships. But, with blogger outreach there are many more options for creative approaches. I've found getting the blogger involved with the brand, campaign, process works pretty well, too. And, as with journalists, I try to make their lives easier. Provide photos, video and lists the blogger can use in a post they pen about your client's product or service.

    @arikhanson

  • http://twitter.com/oh_so_wideawake/statuses/8055097987 oh_so_wideawake (Jessy Cameron

    Twitter Comment






    how fashion bloggers differ from reporters [link to post] thought provoking read for PR execs who pitch to bloggers as well as journos

    Posted using Chat Catcher

  • http://twitter.com/oh_so_wideawake/statuses/8055097987 oh_so_wideawake (Jessy Cameron

    Twitter Comment






    how fashion bloggers differ from reporters [link to post] thought provoking read for PR execs who pitch to bloggers as well as journos

    Posted using Chat Catcher

  • http://www.kherize5.com Suzanne Vara

    Jay

    Congrats on the 30K milestone. Well deserved for sure. I think it also has to do with accessibility to the journalist and the blogger. Bloggers need the traffic and influence so they are everywhere where as journalists are limited by the corporate structure and not as accessible. There are more creative liberties enjoyed by bloggers they write the way that is best for them and readers who like it read, but journalists have to speak more to the masses under the corporate veil. It is not to say they are not creative but the structure of their employer does not afford them the opportunities that bloggers receive.

    Great topic!

  • http://www.kherize5.com Suzanne Vara

    Jay

    Congrats on the 30K milestone. Well deserved for sure. I think it also has to do with accessibility to the journalist and the blogger. Bloggers need the traffic and influence so they are everywhere where as journalists are limited by the corporate structure and not as accessible. There are more creative liberties enjoyed by bloggers they write the way that is best for them and readers who like it read, but journalists have to speak more to the masses under the corporate veil. It is not to say they are not creative but the structure of their employer does not afford them the opportunities that bloggers receive.

    Great topic!

  • http://www.beastoftraal.com/ Karthik

    I like the 4 points in the end – they make sense too. I had explored this topic some time back, in a post, from the perspective of motivation and the point of view of what is better suited for PR professionals, in terms of a social media outreach for a client. It got some good comments too. The point was – what makes better sense for clients (of a PR agency) – a note from a 'journalist' about the product/ service? Or a note from a blogger? A journalist has a job, to report. A blogger doesn't and can write based on personal experience, thereby making it more powerful for a client. But influence and reach are essential to showcase value. Here's more of my post,
    http://itwofs.com/beastoftraal/2009/05/06/blogg

  • http://www.ivanwalsh.com Ivan Walsh

    Jay,

    A blog is your cv, business card, and sales pitch all rolled into one.

  • http://www.ivanwalsh.com Ivan Walsh

    Jay,

    A blog is your cv, business card, and sales pitch all rolled into one.

  • http://www.ivanwalsh.com Ivan Walsh

    Hi Jay,

    I think Ari is right.

    Most reporters I know work flat out. It''s a v competitive business they're in. The pay is not that great and if they slip up there are often legal consequences.

    Saying 'business models make bloggers a different breed of cat' is just changing the goal posts to defend your position.

    The article is not about biz models but how blogger/reports differ.

    For me, it's the platform that's the biggest differentiator. Once journos gets web-savvy the lines will blur.

    Ivan

  • http://www.ivanwalsh.com Ivan Walsh

    Hi Jay,

    I think Ari is right.

    Most reporters I know work flat out. It''s a v competitive business they're in. The pay is not that great and if they slip up there are often legal consequences.

    Saying 'business models make bloggers a different breed of cat' is just changing the goal posts to defend your position.

    The article is not about biz models but how blogger/reports differ.

    For me, it's the platform that's the biggest differentiator. Once journos gets web-savvy the lines will blur.

    Ivan

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    Thanks so much Suzanne. No question that editors and corporate restrictions don't give journalists the same liberties as bloggers. Who regulates me? Me. (and readers)

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    Thanks so much Suzanne. No question that editors and corporate restrictions don't give journalists the same liberties as bloggers. Who regulates me? Me. (and readers)

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    Thanks for the comment, and for the great post. Readers, check it out. It's a good one.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    Thanks for the comment, and for the great post. Readers, check it out. It's a good one.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    I hear you. I'm just saying that writing is really a very small part of what I do. Writing/reporting is all that most journalists do. Thus, I have less time to devote to writing, and a lower tolerance for bullshit vis a vis what I write – or people ask me to write about – as a consequence. I'm not making a judgement, I'm just pointing out the difference.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    I hear you. I'm just saying that writing is really a very small part of what I do. Writing/reporting is all that most journalists do. Thus, I have less time to devote to writing, and a lower tolerance for bullshit vis a vis what I write – or people ask me to write about – as a consequence. I'm not making a judgement, I'm just pointing out the difference.

  • karimacatherne

    Hello Jay

    The post gives clearly the differences. this is great.
    When you say that the 2 currencies important for bloggers are Influence and Traffic, I would say the same applies to journalists. the change in paradigm in their industry and the transition to online editions make them in need of Influence and traffic. they need to monetize.

    Love to hear what you think.

    thanks
    @karimacatherine

  • karimacatherine

    Hello Jay

    The post gives clearly the differences. this is great.
    When you say that the 2 currencies important for bloggers are Influence and Traffic, I would say the same applies to journalists. the change in paradigm in their industry and the transition to online editions make them in need of Influence and traffic. they need to monetize.

    Love to hear what you think.

    thanks
    @karimacatherine

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  • http://www.ivanwalsh.com Ivan Walsh

    Sure, it makes sense to have a BS detector. We all need one.

    I try to talk up those I admire (Johnny Hayton & Valeria Maltoni) and give them some sunshine.

    Saying that, I don’t have a very romantic view of bloggers per se (not talking about you, btw) as while there are some nice people out there, there’s also the pond-life endlessly ranting on about Trust, though you know they’d sell you in a heartbeat.

  • http://www.ivanwalsh.com Ivan Walsh

    Sure, it makes sense to have a BS detector. We all need one.

    I try to talk up those I admire (Johnny Hayton & Valeria Maltoni) and give them some sunshine.

    Saying that, I don’t have a very romantic view of bloggers per se (not talking about you, btw) as while there are some nice people out there, there’s also the pond-life endlessly ranting on about Trust, though you know they’d sell you in a heartbeat.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    I don't know Johnny. I'll check him out. Valeria is one of my very favorite people, and one of the bloggers (and marketers) I really, really respect. You're right about the signal to noise ratio. You know what's the fifth difference between bloggers and journalists? Barrier to entry.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    I don't know Johnny. I'll check him out. Valeria is one of my very favorite people, and one of the bloggers (and marketers) I really, really respect. You're right about the signal to noise ratio. You know what's the fifth difference between bloggers and journalists? Barrier to entry.

  • http://www.suarez.id.au/ Hannah

    When I obtain content for my blog, another thing that I look for is media that can be embedded. I LOVE it when I can embed a video, animation, Slideshare presentation, a YouTube vide, image gallery and more into my blog and I usually request it (not all the time though). If someone gives me a link to media or a code that I can use chances are high that I will use it. PR should include embeddable media into their pitch, in fact, they should modify their pitch to make it more interesting for bloggers.

  • http://www.suarez.id.au/ Hannah

    When I obtain content for my blog, another thing that I look for is media that can be embedded. I LOVE it when I can embed a video, animation, Slideshare presentation, a YouTube vide, image gallery and more into my blog and I usually request it (not all the time though). If someone gives me a link to media or a code that I can use chances are high that I will use it. PR should include embeddable media into their pitch, in fact, they should modify their pitch to make it more interesting for bloggers.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    Really good point about embedding. Excellent tip. That's why I prefer PR folks use something like PitchEngine.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com jaybaer

    Really good point about embedding. Excellent tip. That's why I prefer PR folks use something like PitchEngine.

  • http://twitter.com/ScrambleThis/statuses/8129875448 ScrambleThis (Rudy Betancourt)

    Twitter Comment


    4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters [link to post] #journalism

    Posted using Chat Catcher

  • http://twitter.com/ScrambleThis/statuses/8129875448 ScrambleThis (Rudy Betancourt)

    Twitter Comment






    4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters [link to post] #journalism

    Posted using Chat Catcher

  • http://twitter.com/ScrambleThis/statuses/8129875448 ScrambleThis (Rudy Betancourt)

    Twitter Comment






    4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters [link to post] #journalism

    Posted using Chat Catcher

  • http://ubermarketing.wordpress.com Akash Sharma

    Great thoughts Jay, I think both bloggers and Journalists work hard on what they do but bloggers might have an upper hand because they think a lot about what they write then get it up there with all the editing required, then promote it themselves.
    If we compare this with the journalists they only write stuff which they collect from various sources, they don't do much of the editing and they are no where near promotions.
    Thanks for inciting the Topic again…..

  • http://ubermarketing.wordpress.com Akash Sharma

    Great thoughts Jay, I think both bloggers and Journalists work hard on what they do but bloggers might have an upper hand because they think a lot about what they write then get it up there with all the editing required, then promote it themselves.
    If we compare this with the journalists they only write stuff which they collect from various sources, they don't do much of the editing and they are no where near promotions.
    Thanks for inciting the Topic again…..

  • http://twitter.com/23Kazoos Wendy Kenney

    Great post Jay, and thanks for sharing your info at #SMAZ!

  • http://twitter.com/23Kazoos Wendy Kenney

    Great post Jay, and thanks for sharing your info at #SMAZ!

  • http://twitter.com/tommy_landry Tommy Landry

    I love PitchEngine. Great idea, and it alleviates the problems with spam that you highlighted above in addition to allowing you to easily embed multimedia.

  • http://twitter.com/tommy_landry Tommy Landry

    I love PitchEngine. Great idea, and it alleviates the problems with spam that you highlighted above in addition to allowing you to easily embed multimedia.

  • http://twitter.com/sidfernando/statuses/8226167977 sidfernando (Sid Fernando + Obser)

    Twitter Comment


    RT @Ramikantari: RT @tweetmeme 4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters [link to post]

    Posted using Chat Catcher

  • http://twitter.com/Jericles Jeremy Fischer

    Jay,

    This is why I love social media. You learn something new every day. I had no idea that you were a fellow fan of fantasy football. I hope your season ended far better than mine, sir.

  • http://twitter.com/Jericles Jeremy Fischer

    Jay,

    This is why I love social media. You learn something new every day. I had no idea that you were a fellow fan of fantasy football. I hope your season ended far better than mine, sir.

  • http://twitter.com/sidfernando/statuses/8226167977 sidfernando (Sid Fernando + Ob

    Twitter Comment






    RT @Ramikantari: RT @tweetmeme 4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters [link to post]

    Posted using Chat Catcher

  • http://twitter.com/sidfernando/statuses/8226167977 sidfernando (Sid Fernando + Ob

    Twitter Comment






    RT @Ramikantari: RT @tweetmeme 4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters [link to post]

    Posted using Chat Catcher

  • http://kikolani.com/ Kristi Hines

    I think the greatest thing that separates bloggers from reporters is that bloggers can release their viewpoint immediately on a platform that people have access to worldwide. In addition, they can publicize their content through multiple channels, such as a tweet, Facebook status, email subscription, etc. that people can access from a computer, mobile phone, etc.

    Comparatively, a journalist for a column in a local paper could write about a event that happens today, but it won't be posted until tomorrow in a format that only those who subscribe to that paper locally can access (unless the newspaper is also online). And a local news anchor generally has to wait until the 6 o'clock time slot before they can share their report with local cable viewers.

  • http://kikolani.com/ Kristi Hines

    I think the greatest thing that separates bloggers from reporters is that bloggers can release their viewpoint immediately on a platform that people have access to worldwide. In addition, they can publicize their content through multiple channels, such as a tweet, Facebook status, email subscription, etc. that people can access from a computer, mobile phone, etc.

    Comparatively, a journalist for a column in a local paper could write about a event that happens today, but it won't be posted until tomorrow in a format that only those who subscribe to that paper locally can access (unless the newspaper is also online). And a local news anchor generally has to wait until the 6 o'clock time slot before they can share their report with local cable viewers.

  • http://twitter.com/AngryJulie/statuses/8269100786 AngryJulie (Julie D.)

    Twitter Comment


    Awesome article! Explains it perfectly! RT @onlineprbook: RT @PublicityGuru 4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters [link to post] #pr

    Posted using Chat Catcher

  • http://twitter.com/AngryJulie/statuses/8269100786 AngryJulie (Julie D.)

    Twitter Comment






    Awesome article! Explains it perfectly! RT @onlineprbook: RT @PublicityGuru 4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters [link to post] #pr

    Posted using Chat Catcher

  • http://twitter.com/AngryJulie/statuses/8269100786 AngryJulie (Julie D.)

    Twitter Comment






    Awesome article! Explains it perfectly! RT @onlineprbook: RT @PublicityGuru 4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters [link to post] #pr

    Posted using Chat Catcher

  • http://twitter.com/f2facebook/status/8375367881 Face to Facebook

    RT @jaybaer 4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters http://bit.ly/cpE5GS #SMM

  • http://twitter.com/tinhangliu/status/8375370890 Tin Hang Liu

    RT @jaybaer 4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters http://bit.ly/cpE5GS #SMM

  • http://twitter.com/landrakis_jr/status/8499226885 Stelios Landrakis Jr

    Μην μπερδεύεις τους bloggers με τους reporters http://ow.ly/10Slw

  • http://twitter.com/jia_tan/status/8605449048 J Tan

    4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters http://bit.ly/a9nRwt

  • http://twitter.com/ksuzan/status/8622837803 Kenneth Suzan

    RT @jaybaer 4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters http://bit.ly/6uZHIP

  • http://twitter.com/newspapergrl/status/8647826482 Janet MeinersThaeler

    4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters http://bit.ly/9bbd5w

  • http://twitter.com/darthcheeta/status/8648662281 David Johnson

    RT @NewspaperGrl: 4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters http://bit.ly/9bbd5w

  • http://twitter.com/vicki_kunkel/status/8729886030 Vicki Kunkel

    RT @jaybaer 4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters http://bit.ly/6uZHIP

  • May

    HI Jay,

    You are absolutely right about the blogging mentality. My question to you is, do you think that reporters are going to become useless over time? Do you feel people will still need the credibility of an opinion free (ideally speaking) news source, or will blogging become the main source of information gathering for people?

    If so, how will the criteria fro credibility for each blogger be maintained??

  • May

    HI Jay,

    You are absolutely right about the blogging mentality. My question to you is, do you think that reporters are going to become useless over time? Do you feel people will still need the credibility of an opinion free (ideally speaking) news source, or will blogging become the main source of information gathering for people?

    If so, how will the criteria fro credibility for each blogger be maintained??

  • http://twitter.com/freddymunoz/status/8976628626 Freddy Muñoz

    4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters – http://bit.ly/b3TGBx

  • http://twitter.com/mjcalvimontes/status/8976749167 Ma. José Calvimontes

    4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters http://is.gd/8bhR5 vía @freddymunoz

  • http://twitter.com/m_roze/status/10894030985 Monica Rozenfeld

    4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters via @jaybaer http://bit.ly/aZkqvj

  • http://twitter.com/m_roze/status/10894030985 Monica Rozenfeld

    4 Ways Bloggers Differ From Reporters via @jaybaer http://bit.ly/aZkqvj

  • http://twitter.com/wadvisor A Homayoun Rafizadeh

    Great post on bloggers creating influence Jay. If the material is well written, anyone can forward/tweet/post it to their networks and before you know it, its gone viral. I also totally agree about speaking opportunities and showing people how this can be done (not keeping secrets).
    As always well written.

  • letstalkandchat

    I just found a great company that builds websites for info products. To keep your costs low, they’ll mentor you on how to create your site, design a marketing funnel (one of the guys works in Hollywood and makes really slick videos), and the other guy programmed Myspace. If you’re looking to have professional web design for your small business and not waste any time or money then check their site out. Check them out: http://www.mikelmurphy.com/easy-info-product-site-system/

  • http://www.marketingtechblog.com Douglas Karr

    We look at value to our audience as the only requirement for sharing a pitch. If it’s not going to be valuable to our audience, we won’t run it. The PR folks that take the time to read our blog, understand how our posts are written, and provide us the necessary info – screenshots, quotes, insights, etc. always get a post. The other ones get ignored!

    • http://www.convinceandconvert.com/ jaybaer

      That really should be the filter for all marketing, yes? Relevancy trumps all.

      • http://www.marketingtechblog.com Douglas Karr

        Amen! But I’m surprised at how many people publish ‘guest’ posts that really have no value. I think some PR folks are really, really good at pitching. :)

        • http://www.convinceandconvert.com/ jaybaer

          Yeah, and some people just are desperate for content, and will run whatever.