How to Use Industry Insights to Improve Your Content Strategy

Ron Tite joins Content Pros to share the sage wisdom he’s gleaned from “worrying about tomorrow” as CEO of the Tite Group, including necessary mental shifts in content marketing, simplicity, authenticity, and just making things better one day at a time.

In This Episode:

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Full Episode Details

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Leading With Imperfections

Originally from the world of stand-up comedy, Ron Tite was named one of the “Top Ten Creative Canadians” by Marketing Magazine. He is an executive producer, host, and author. His upcoming book, “Everyone’s An Artist (Or At Least They Should Be),” will be published by HarperCollins in the spring of 2016.

As CEO of the Tite Group, Ron leads a unique team of 25 people at his Toronto-based social media content agency, boasting such clients as Microsoft, Evian, Hershey, Intel, and Johnson & Johnson.

Ron has found that it’s important to concern himself with “tomorrow,” mixing thought-leadership forecasting with business development and enriching his progressive wisdom on the topic of content marketing. He shares his analysis of the current state of affairs within a historical context, discussing the cause of the fall of editorial integrity, the now blurred line between pure-play content and traditional advertising, and what these changes mean for you.

Besides his more technical wisdom, Ron also hits upon some sage advice, speaking to the importance of authenticity and personality, and pointing out that it is our flaws and idiosyncrasies that define who we are.

In This Episode

  • How to use “OTT” or “over-the-top content”
  • How the content spectrum has changed and why that’s important
  • How the decrease in editorial integrity affects you and your content
  • “Why it’s better to own than to rent” applied to content marketing
  • How to deal with the hecklers
  • Why most people don’t know their clients’ true competitors
  • What you can learn from Donald Trump

 

Quotes From This Episode

“Enough with these big innovation programs. Let’s just find a better way every day. That’s what we try to do.” —@rontite

“What’s great about the world of content is that there’s never been a better time than right now to fail, because if you fail, the cost of production was ridiculously low, and if you fail it meant that only two people saw it.” —@rontite

“Who’s the client competing against? They’re not competing against the other competitors in their category. They’re competing against the internet. People used to vote with their wallets, and now they vote with their time. If you can’t win the battle for time, you’re dead. I don’t care how much you spend. I don’t care where you spend it. If you’re not better than the stuff they have at their fingertips, you’re dead. You’ve got to win the battle for time, so let’s start there.” —@rontite

“People are overlooking that we really want to own our own audience, and they’re still renting. It’s always better to own than to rent.” —@rontite

Resources

 

What Did You Want to Be When You Grew Up?

In the 11th grade, Ron did a stand-up comedy routine for his high school’s Christmas show and was bit by the performing bug.

“I remember doing it for the first time and having a room of 500–600 people laughing, and thinking if I could do this for the rest of my life… what could be better? You’re on an elevated platform and hundreds of people are responding positively to what you’re performing onstage. It’s like crack. It’s really addictive.”

He finds that there’s a great relationship between stand-up and his current job. “I think now that the speaking stuff where I stopped consciously selling myself as a comedian and more on selling myself as a speaker who just happens to be funny, the speaking is a version of stand-up comedy. It’s just stand-up comedy with a message, if you will. So that’s something that, for my whole life, I’ve just loved the craft of stand-up.”

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